Setting up systematic structures for policy-recommendations and best-practice sharing: PROCSEE project

Setting up systematic structures for policy-recommendations and best-practice sharing: PROCSEE project by Alicia-Leonor Sauli-Miklavčič, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_SAULI-MIKLAVCIC.pdf (1.0 MB)

Teaching Programmable Logic Controller with 3D virtual production line

Teaching Programmable Logic Controller with 3D virtual production line by Florence Lecroq, Jean Grieu, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_LECROQ-GRIEU.pdf (2.6 MB) - Today, the fourth industrial revolution is underway. Factories become global networking systems. Industrial production centers are equipped with fully automated, flexible and interconnected units. Machines communicate with each other, without human intervention. Big Data massively produced and collected by various components on the production line allow replicating virtual parts of this chain in order to generate simulations of process or tests. With these new training tools, technicians can familiarize themselves with working environment and understand complex procedures. This approach can even be used to facilitate repairs and predictive maintenance. Virtual Reality will be one the crucial points and key factor of success of the Industry 4.0. Considering this context, we built a syllabus on PLCs (Programmable Logic Controllers) using 3D virtual operational parts for teaching. The use of 3D environments by students for learning will be developed in this presentation. Our students are in Electric and Industrial IT Department of the IUT (INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY). For the virtual operational parts, we use software which simulates various virtual operational parts. This software uses the technologies of video games. Our students, “digital natives”, quickly understand the functioning of the system. They work on real PLC, with the professional software they will encounter in industry. The real inputs and output of the PLC are connected to a device which collects the real information and orders, which return to the PC via USB to act in the simulator. The programs carried out by the students manage directly the real PLC inputs and outputs. The actions are immediately visible on the screen where is posted the simulator of operational parts. The students see in real time the results of the program, boxes moving on the various conveyors.

2017 27th Annual Conference: All contributions

2017 27th Annual Conference: All contributions by misc, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_contributions.zip (65.2 MB) -

All contributions to EURASHE's 27th Annual Conference: posters, keynotes, breakout sessions, and good practices

An Industry Sourced Platform for Academic Quality Assurance Processes

An Industry Sourced Platform for Academic Quality Assurance Processes by Barry O’Connor, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_OCONNOR.pdf (0.3 MB) -

A Dynamic and Integrated Evaluation and Reporting Process (DIERP) is proposed to address some of the current questions in Academic Quality Assurance (AQA). The proposed platform would enable a more integrated and consistent approach to AQA across the full spectrum from the learner and academic practitioner, through Higher Education Institutions (HEI) to national and international quality and accreditation agencies. While the questions which form the basis of the academic review process are numerous, they are indeed a finite number. Hence they can be structured in a coherent way. Supported by off-the-shelf interpretative tools, the products in many cases of industrial process control/ validation developments, a new template can be put in place to support a coherent approach to AQA and institutional validation. This, in turn, will lead to advances in benchmarking, AQA enhancement and mutual recognition of qualifications, professional licenses etc. The migration of these tools from industrial/manufacturing sphere would well mirror the original transfer of Deming’s PDCA toolkit into earlier AQA practices. It is time to embrace new technology and generate new ideas in AQA. Process Analytic Technology (PAT) offers a new platform for AQA. DIERP would enhance AQA processes and align some with industry methodologies, increasing industry understanding and acceptability of academic quality values and outcomes, providing a common platform for industry and academic stakeholders alike. Issues such as what, when and how to review, compliance or enhancement and relevant ICT enabling tools are other components in this platform. This input is an example of proposed best answering the increasing demands for evidence-based accreditation and validation exercises.

Project Proposals’ Assessment and Evaluation The Point of View of the Evaluator

Project Proposals’ Assessment and Evaluation The Point of View of the Evaluator by Nina J Zugic, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_ZUGIC.pdf (1.0 MB) -

Rationale: Assessment and evaluation requirements are vital to the success of a project proposal. Expertise of each member of the Consortium, clear objectives that are corresponding the outcomes, and robust implementation of the work plan are the key elements for addressing the Excellence, Impact and Implementation criterion of HORIZON 2020 project proposal evaluation. Learning Objective(s):- To introduce Project Proposals’ Assessment and Evaluation Criterion - To develop better understanding of the Assessment and Evaluation process - To share good practice of successfully funded projects. Overview: This workshop will assist attendees in the analysis of project proposals’ assessment and evaluation process. Abstract Details: This workshop will use samples of successfully funded HORIZON 2020 project proposals to showcase the assessment and evaluation process. The Evaluator’s point of view will help attendees understand the process better. Attendees will identify its personal/future proposal development needs, in a form of a group exercise. Attendees will be also encouraged to transfer this knowledge in developing its own proposals, involving Universities of Applied Sciences and other PHE institutions. Workshop Interactivity: Workshop will be interactive, with examples, case studies and group exercises.

Relevant in the era of industry 4.0

Relevant in the era of industry 4.0 by Elka Walsh, Brad Donaldson, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_WALSH-DONALDSON.pdf (1.9 MB) -

To remain competitive in the 4th Industrial Revolution, industry must adapt quickly. To remain relevant to students, society and employers in this changing environment, higher education institutions must also transform. The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) just celebrated its 100th anniversary, and with input from strategic business partners, is actively adjusting its long standing planning processes to ensure close alignment to the rapidly changing economy. With over 10,000 industry partners, and 49,000 students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) focused programs and courses, SAIT has a new strategic plan and academic plan, and is focusing on diversifying its program mix, deepening and broadening industry partnerships, innovating in applied education, and growing applied research. The path has not been easy as the characteristics of the 4th Industrial Revolution are still morphing. To ensure ongoing communication, SAIT adjusted its entire planning processes. The Board of Governors annual retreat now considers trends associated with the 4th Industrial Revolution and how to position the institution; the President hosts a bi-annual roundtable with industry to understand their changing workforce needs; the new Academic Plan ensures all academic areas are considering innovative multi-disciplinary programming opportunities, skills and delivery modes. This workshop introduces participants to SAIT’s new planning approach, including lessons learned. Participants will engage in work groups to critique aspects of SAIT’s approach and share their own institution’s efforts to adapt. Participants will receive a summary of the discussion after the conference.

Strategic Partnerships And Building A Consortium Of Universities Of Applied Sciences: The Good Practice Of The Urban Research And Education Knowledge Alliance (U!REKA)

Strategic Partnerships And Building A Consortium Of Universities Of Applied Sciences: The Good Practice Of The Urban Research And Education Knowledge Alliance (U!REKA) by Erik van den Berg, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_VANDENBERG.pdf (2.7 MB) -

This good practice will share insights and experiences of building close-knit international partnerships. The Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences took the initiative to found U!REKA to enhance the quality of applied sciences and professional education. Collaboration between the six U!REKA partners will focus on an urban agenda of smart cities, innovating regions and a triple helix approach. This good practice will center on conceptual and operational challenges of preferred partnerships and invites you to share your experience and reflect on the suitability of this approach for your own institution.

Engaging Effectively with European Partners (post-Brexit)

Engaging Effectively with European Partners (post-Brexit) by Alan Sherry, Dugald Craig, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_SHERRY-CRAIG.pdf (1.1 MB) -

Objectives: -To explain the implications of Britain leaving the EU -To reinforce Scotland’s position in the context of “Brexit” -To look at how partnerships may be maintained and extended in the context of “Brexit”. Questions: 1. Does the UK leaving the European Union mean that there will be significantly less opportunities for institutions in other countries to partner with their peers in the UK? 2. Will the UK refrain from participating in the EQF? 3. Will the UK’s participation in international cooperation such as through EURASHE be reduced by the former’s exit from the European Union?

The smart factory with a part production concept in higher education – paper

The smart factory with a part production concept in higher education - paper by Gorazd Rakovec, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_RAKOVEC_paper.pdf (0.2 MB) -

The 4th industrial revolution was responsible for the formation of a new science. In Germany, the new science was named Industry 4.0. The new jobs with the titles: Architect Industry 4.0 (or digitalization, Internet of Things ...), Consultant Industry 4.0, Engineer Industry 4.0, etc., were created. Technical schools have begun offering new subjects for Industry 4.0. A short description of the business model has been written which brings significant upgrades across all the business functions. The interactional block diagram of the manufacturing and logistics CPS (Cyber Physical Systems) has been drawn and described. The factory of the 4th revolution called the Smart Factory is the synthesis of the 3rd Industrial Revolution systems with the upgraded process feedback loop. The new system - Smart Factory, was built using the basic units - islands and IIoT systems, which are the synthesis of manufacturing, handling, assembly, logistic and control, machines, tools, products, PLM-CAx systems, ERP, MES, SCADA and Process systems. The biggest novelty in production is the decentralized logistics of the products which navigate themselves. The biggest advantage of the Smart Factory is the ability that staff can learn the processes much better. The longer they learn, the more they know and more added value they produce. Therefore, the Smart Factory is built for people who work to seventy years of age and older, and every day they become smarter.

Applied Universities as Platform-Based Innovation Hubs

Applied Universities as Platform-Based Innovation Hubs by Hannes Raffaseder, Gabriele Permoser, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_RAFFASEDER-PERMOSER.pdf (1.5 MB) -

Amongst the most influencing effects of digitalization is a shift from product to platform-based companies. Instead of selling products, organizations such as Google or Airbnb establish multi sided platforms to manage relationships with various stakeholders and enable direct interactions between them. These transitions have a major impact on business models and workflows as well as everyday life as part of a new digital culture. Universities have been regarded as product-based providers of education and research offering courses and degrees to students as well as scientific papers and other research outcome to industry and society. However, they have strong potential to act as platformbased innovation hubs providing a vehicle for smart individuals from different disciplines and a diverse variety of institutions to interact with each other. Finding overlaps between different needs is key to sustainable success and interdisciplinary skills, creativity and collaboration are core competences to keep up with an accelerating digital society. While an inside-out approach is in general more difficult for the industry, universities tend to have problems with outsiders engaging in academic activity. Thus, HEIs not only have to develop competence profiles of study programs and research on digital topics, but have to re-think their missions and strategies to become consistent with a digital society. The breakout-session promotes a shift into platform-based innovation hubs. After a short overview of related theory, major challenges are discussed. Participants share ideas and approaches to manage relationships with various stakeholders and enable direct interactions between them in order to implement a “digital culture”.

Opening the ivory tower – third mission activities of small universities of applied sciences in context of economy 4.0

Opening the ivory tower – third mission activities of small universities of applied sciences in context of economy 4.0 by Gabriele Permoser, Hannes Raffaseder, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_PERMOSER-RAFFASEDER.pdf (1.7 MB) -

The increasing influence of digital technologies in all areas of life is likewisely challenging economy and society. Automatization and human-machine-interaction are calling for new competencies from the employees. The eased access to knowledge asks for critical thinking from the recipients of information. Especially in the context of digitalization of information and post-truth tendencies, universities of applied sciences (UAS) are important partners both regionally and globally. With numerous activities (ranging from hosting science communication events to continuous training for employees of local SMEs), which cannot directly be assigned to teaching and/or research, they foster knowledge transfer to economy and society. These activities can be summed up as “third mission”. As a result, higher education institutions (HEI) have to open the well-known ivory tower. Third mission leads to a cultural change of the identity of HEIs. They interact with a divers set of various stakeholders and act as platforms for collaborative innovation. In recent years, third mission became a buzzword both used from public authorities as well from HEIs. Nevertheless, these activities aren’t described in any knowledge survey. Metrics, like number of peer reviewed publications and third party funding are still used to illustrate the output of HEIs. Why do especially UAS to open their doors and act as platform for collaborative innovation? How can these activities be evaluated? This poster will describe St. P.lten UAS ideas of a concept for evaluating third mission activities. The idea is to create a set of criteria to show the significance of the interaction with a divers set of stakeholders and how both sides can create a win-win-situation. 

Paving the path towards Universities of Applied Sciences in Hungary – Summary on the Hungarian developments in the field of Professional Higher Education

Paving the path towards Universities of Applied Sciences in Hungary – Summary on the Hungarian developments in the field of Professional Higher Education by Petra Perényi, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_PERENYI.pdf (1.1 MB) -

The worldwide tendency to make a stronger link between higher education and the labour market with the aim to increase the employability of the Youth is clearly reflected in the Hungarian governmental measurements lately. The Hungarian Higher Educational Strategy acknowledges: in order to raise the level and competitiveness of education the affected parties have to accept the concept that state higher education institutions can and must operate as a part of the market. The HE Strategy -with the title „A change of pace in higher education”- includes PHE-related goals and measurements on a large scale, some of which have already been realized. A significant change has been the transformation of the institutional system during 2016, as a result of which many colleges became „universities of applied sciences” offering bachelor and master programs, like universities do, but still keeping the focus on practice, moreover placing stronger emphasis on integrating practice into the programs. In the framework of this an importamt tendency is the establishment of more and more dual courses. Also, there are other complementary pillars of PHE-related improvements: „Industry 4.0 Irinyi” seeks to improve the contribution of the Hungarian industry to the Hungaran GDP, which naturally entails PHE development, while the Centre for the Cooperation of Higher Education and the Industry is responsible to coordinate PHE with R&D&I activities and to make use of scientific results in practice (making the link between applied research and industrial experience) with the aim of increasing effectiveness in business and promoting innovation.

Big Data STEM Education: “The Skills Key”

Big Data STEM Education: “The Skills Key” by Maria Begoña Peña Lang, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_PENA-LANG.pdf (0.1 MB) -

A research to ensure success in learning by developing and implementing BigData Education and Learning Analytics in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Centers with monitoring both in the college stage, as in the corporative world. We believe that learning should be an uninterrupted continuous pathway through different stages of development of the person, from school to the company, passing through the University. Under this prior consideration, our primary objective will be to actively collaborate with all those agents who necessarily must intervene in this long journey, Lifelong Learning, thereby seeking to break the usual lack of communication between them. To achieve this objective, we intend to weave a powerful and effective network of synergetic connections that benefit the individual in both its academic and professional career, as well as the various agencies, institutions and companies that will give it impulse.

Customized x-Learning Environment: e-portfolio integration

Customized x-Learning Environment: e-portfolio integration by Anabela Mesquita, Fernando Moreira, Paula Peres, Lino Oliveira, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_MESQUITA-etal.pdf (0.5 MB) -

Education needs to take into consideration the needs and expectations of each student. Additionally, interaction plays an important role in the creation of knowledge. Since the time in physical environment are more scarce, teachers are adopting learning environments that somehow help to build bridges between the world inside and outside school. These environments are putting more and more the student at the centre. Taking this context into consideration, a Customized xLearning environment (where the X can take the form of electronic, mobile or ubiquitous) model was developed. This model brings together the learning management systems, the personalized learning environment, the social networks (horizontal and vertical ) as well as the knowledge sharing networks. Communication mediator elements are also present enabling the interaction between students, students and teachers and between students and experts and potential employers. Education should not be done with the back to the companies’ environment and one possible solution is, in one hand, to allow experts and potential employers to participate in the professional development of students with assignments and projects’ proposals as well as supervising students. On the other hand students can get closer to the real world by showing them what they are capable of meaning what they have created and developed during their education. This can be done by integrating portfolios in the CxLE. In this poster, we would like to present the CxLE model and how it can integrate the portfolios.

Career services/Journey to the future starts today!

Career services/Journey to the future starts today! by Raimonda Agnė Medeišienė, Elinga Noreikaitė, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_MEDEISIENE_NOREIKAITE_goodpractice.pdf (6.3 MB) -

New Strategies for Working Life Collaboration is a two-year project (09/2014 – 08/2016) which aim is to create new strategies for efficient collaboration between the working life and educational institutions. It has come to grips with six topics: advisory boards, internships, alumni, serving society, project assignments and career services. There are 6 educational institutions from 4 countries involved in this project: Finland, Iceland, Lithuania and Estonia. The good practice includes the experience of the team of Tallinn University of Applied Sciences that is responsible for one of the topics of provision of career services. Therefore, the main attention has been redundant to that field. It brings together the theoretical background, related works, conducted survey and description of the best practices. The project team of TTK UAS examined the needs and strategic importance of career services for students in higher educational institutions. Education can undoubtedly be considered an important influence on the process of entering the labour market, as well as on the development of the early career. The project team appoints Job Shadow Day and Career Day as the best practices in the field of career services. In addition to Job Shadow and Career Days there are elective subjects in curricula of TTK UAS: personal development, teamwork, planning – topics which support students’ career planning.

Career services/Journey to the future starts today! – material

Career services/Journey to the future starts today! - material by Raimonda Agnė Medeišienė, Elinga Noreikaitė, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_MEDEISIENE_NOREIKAITE_goodpractice_material.pdf (4.3 MB) -

New Strategies for Working Life Collaboration is a two-year project (09/2014 – 08/2016) which aim is to create new strategies for efficient collaboration between the working life and educational institutions. It has come to grips with six topics: advisory boards, internships, alumni, serving society, project assignments and career services. There are 6 educational institutions from 4 countries involved in this project: Finland, Iceland, Lithuania and Estonia. The good practice includes the experience of the team of Tallinn University of Applied Sciences that is responsible for one of the topics of provision of career services. Therefore, the main attention has been redundant to that field. It brings together the theoretical background, related works, conducted survey and description of the best practices. The project team of TTK UAS examined the needs and strategic importance of career services for students in higher educational institutions. Education can undoubtedly be considered an important influence on the process of entering the labour market, as well as on the development of the early career. The project team appoints Job Shadow Day and Career Day as the best practices in the field of career services. In addition to Job Shadow and Career Days there are elective subjects in curricula of TTK UAS: personal development, teamwork, planning – topics which support students’ career planning.

Alumni power

Alumni power by Raimonda Agnė Medeišienė, Elinga Noreikaitė, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_MEDEISIENE_NOREIKAITE_breakout.pdf (3.2 MB) -

This break out session is based on findings of the Nordplus Horizontal project New Strategies for Working Life Collaboration (Nr. NPHZ-2014/10017). Most Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and Vocational education and training schools (VETs) in Britain and the US which have established alumni societies appointed coordinators to build relationships as a function of their public relations, foster alumni’s commitment to the institution, strengthen identification with it, and, what is crucially important, increase philanthropic fundraising to the institutions. These departments replicate the functions of customer relationship management (CRM) of private organisations (Stevick, 2010). They build shared databases and seek to maintain valuable relationships with prospective and current alumni (i.e. customers). They keep the alumni in touch with their alma mater by sending out messages about events and testing the concepts of new products (e.g. curricula), which also helps them to anticipate new customers’ needs and respond to labour market demands. Many alumni societies have websites where both alumni and the alma mater share information about the activities and update the news. Other forms of keeping in touch with the alumni and promoting philanthropy for future alumni and their families include welcome receptions for first-year parents in faculty-in-residence apartments, common. Most of the data (and research findings) about the situation of the character, scope and peculiarities of the cooperation between an educational institution and alumni comes from American and British universities. The situation in continental Europe and, in particular, Baltic and Nordic countries remains largely unexplored. A general situation of alumni activities in most HEIs is fragmented. Most of the universities, same as VET schools, based on the website monitoring, seem to compile a database of the alumni but this is based on voluntariness. Many social gatherings are irregular, they are organized spontaneously. Rarely is there a person whose tasks include coordination of alumni activities.

Increasing South Baltic Mobility and Understanding Via Virtual Communication Platforms in Nurse Education

Increasing South Baltic Mobility and Understanding Via Virtual Communication Platforms in Nurse Education by Hélène Taylor Kelly, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_KELLY.pdf (5.1 MB) -

The EU promotes workforce mobility within member states and the recognition of educational qualifications in order to match labour market needs. COHAB (Co-ordination and integration of higher education and the labour market around the South Baltic Sea) an EU funded project focused upon enhancing staff and student competencies for South Baltic mobility. Central to the project was the use of virtual communication. A joint semester course was developed that involved study trips, parallel teaching sessions using virtual communication systems, and IT based interactive learning objects. Students rated the semester positively and the project has contributed to professional development both at the personal and the institutional level.

Optimizing translator training and student employability through project-based learning: The case of the IATE terminology project

Optimizing translator training and student employability through project-based learning: The case of the IATE terminology project by Themis Kaniklidou, Emmanuel Peclaris, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_KANIKLIDOU-PECLARIS.pdf (0.1 MB) -

Terminology and terminography, although under-researched, form key competencies for professional translators and interpreters in multilingual and multimedia settings (EMT expert group). Particularly, terminology, i.e. the study and analysis of terms as concepts has gradually started to infiltrate translator training and pedagogy as it has been observed that it plays a considerable role in the professional lives of translators. This contribution wishes to foreground the increasingly central role of terminology in translator training. To do that, it presents the IATE project rolling out by students in the Master of Arts in Translation program in cooperation with the terminology coordination unit of the European Parliament (TERMCOORD). The aims of the project are three: first the project aims to present an optimal example of a good practice towards professionalization and employability enhancement of graduate students, one that reinvents the ties between academic institutions and other industry stakeholders. As gradually more and more employers are seeking for evidence-based results to assess how employable and ready-for-the-market students are, this project forms a good practice to showcase ways of making them employable for the translation industry and Language Service Provision. Secondly, it aims at showing the applicability of terminology for translator training and development. Although terminology and terminography are interdisciplinary in nature and can potentially prove beneficial areas for other disciplinary domains, they remain grounded on a concept-based theory orientation which requires training on terminology theory. Transferability of terminological competence, however, is possible to other disciplines particularly if combined with some theory-based training. Thirdly, it aims to reveal the potential of learning through interaction and engagement; it shows how students are engaged in terminographical work that includes compiling domain-specific glossaries. The project foregrounds how students learn to conduct terminographical research by engaging with thematic experts and establishing links with industry stakeholders. Other elements highlighted also include the interactivity between students and project coordinators.

Focusing on innovation competencies –examples of successful projects with the help of EU co-funding

Focusing on innovation competencies –examples of successful projects with the help of EU co-funding by Liisa Kairisto-Mertanen, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_KAIRISTO-MERTANEN.pdf (2.9 MB)

Higher education for learning and skills development 4.0

Higher education for learning and skills development 4.0 by Raimund Hudak, Anna Frankenberg, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_HUDAK-FRANKENBERG.pdf (0.8 MB) -

To be prepared for digitization, it is obligatory to combine the understanding of theoretical foundations with the ability to develop practical solutions and products. Mediation of hybrid qualifications and skills is on the rise. Work society is in constant change. Consequently, the education sector has to change constantly in order to adapt to those changes. Therefore, a close link between HE and the world of work (enterprises) is getting more and more important focusing at the development of PHE. Changed societal demands and values play also an important role in both the world of work and PHE – individual development is vital. So how can the expectations from an individual, the world of work and from education be understood and met today? How can these three important players (students, PHE institutions and enterprises) come together in times of 4.0? A big step to solve the issue is tried by the Erasmus+ project “Boosting European Exchange on Higher VET/PHE and Employer Involvement in Education Structures”. The BEEHiVES project is designed to address cooperation and collaboration barriers and best practices in the strategic partnership triangle – HVET/PHE institutions, employers/labour markets and students – to contribute to the development of skills relevant to labour market needs and equip students with the knowledge and skills relevant for their long-term employability, entrepreneurship and personal development. What are the key topics that need to be changed to become a PHE 4.0 institution? How should the collaboration between the three stakeholder groups (PHE, World of work and student) be strengthen in order to be effective towards the constant changes and needs of 4.0. The best practice of cooperation within the strategic partnership triangle so far is the Cooperative State University Baden Wuerttemberg, with their dual study system combining theory and practice throughout a study programme. Important are the set policies by the state government´s education laws to implement enterprises as partner companies and students in the commission for quality assurance and expert commission of the DHBW, as well as being members of the Senate.

Virtual Classroom as a method to keep in touch with your students during the externship

Virtual Classroom as a method to keep in touch with your students during the externship by Kurt Hoffmann, Diane Freiberger, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_HOFFMANN-FREIBERGER.pdf (5.5 MB) -

The situation which was the trigger for the good practice we present as a contribution to the conference was the need, to get in contact with our student during the externship and to provide them with necessary content for preparing their final thesis. At the University of applied sciences Kufstein we send all our students abroad for one term and also in an externship. During the absence of the home university it is important, that we still be in contact with our students. After staying abroad students have to design and finalize their Bachelor thesis. We recognized the lack of contact hours. On the one hand this creates a lack of necessary content we want to give them before they do the thesis and on the other hand, students need time to find back to the home university and this causes a time lack for working on their thesis. The question we were facing was, how can we make sure to provide the necessary content and how can we be in relations to our students. Therefore, we design a virtual classroom session. Subject oriented objective of the course is, to train students in transferring practice experience into theory. The learning outcome of the course is, that students are able to understand the formation of theories, can reflect and evaluate them and have a comprehensive understanding about the issue, so they can applicate theories in a useful way (e.g. in the Bachelor thesis). The course design was based on Merrill’s four phases of learning on: Activation of prior experience (getting practice experience during the externship, passing the course academic writing), Demonstration of skills (present comprehensive group paper about informations of the topic theory of science), Application of skills (Writing an individual paper as a conclusion of the findings about the theory of science and the input out of the practical experience), Integrations of these skills into real-world activities (Basic of Expos. of the Bachelor thesis). The course is a full online course at the LMS “moodle”. Different features like group forum, chat room, web conferences, data storage support the course lessons.

Where Would We Go from Here?- The Dilemmas of the Acedemic and Practice-Orientation of Universities of Applied Sciences

Where Would We Go from Here?- The Dilemmas of the Acedemic and Practice-Orientation of Universities of Applied Sciences by Balázs Heidrich, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_HEIDRICH.pdf (0.6 MB) -

Universities of applied sciences are becoming more and more accepted in higher education systems all over Europe. Previously very Humboldtian higher education systems like the Hungarian and Austrian have also introduced this institutional category. However these ”latecomers” have to face the multifaceted challenge of convergence vs. divergence as compared to traditional universities. The strategic challenge here is: how much to converge to the academic-orientation of traditional universities and with the academic requirements of national regulation or how much to diverge to the ever increasing needs of the corporate world? Humboldtian systems with no formal recognition of professional higher education raise serious burdens to respond to the above mentioned questions? The seemingly ambidextrious strategic question is how to fulfill both needs? What kind of human resources are needed to respond to the twofold challenge? What kind of organizational cultural challenges would a university of applied sciences face in such external environment?

EMREX Supporting Student Mobility

EMREX Supporting Student Mobility by Anders Bogebjerg, Hansen, Mats Lindstedt, Pamela Engstrom, Geir Vangen, Janina Mincer-Daszkiewicz, Stefano Russo, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_HANSEN-etal.pdf (0.3 MB) -

EMREX is the solution for electronic transfer of achievement records between HEIs in Europe and supports student mobility with smooth and fast transfer of records. EMREX is co-funded by ERASMUS+ and is currently conducting a field trial in Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway and Sweden with additional countries already signing up. We will show how EMREX works and present some findings from the field trial. We will also address the more general privacy issue and other obstacles related to electronic exchanges across countries, and how we can solve them. We will also present the student’s view and feedback on EMREX and show possible implications of ownership of achievement records. Is it the student who owns the records, and what would that mean? How do we see the long term implications of EMREX, and how can it be used as a building block for automatic recognition, admission services and credential verification across countries and HEIs? We will also examine how EMREX is linked to the EU’s goals on student mobility.

Employability in the European context and ensuring the quality of work based learning

Employability in the European context and ensuring the quality of work based learning by Marko Grdosic, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_GRDOSIC.pdf (0.3 MB)

Strategic Partnership for Building Professional Higher Education Capacity in Europe: the BuildPHE Project

Strategic Partnership for Building Professional Higher Education Capacity in Europe: the BuildPHE Project by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (0.8 MB) -

The main objective of the Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership “BuildPHE” project is to increase the quality of the connection of Higher Education with the world of work (WoW) in all its aspects, including teaching, learning, research and governance. The project is coordinated by the State Higher Vocational School in Tarnow (Poland), other partners are institutions from Czech Republic, Croatia, Estonia and Slovenia, as well as EURASHE and Knowledge Innovation Centre Malta. The project is made up of three complementary activities: analysis of institutional strategies, collection of best practice, design of interventions to strengthen institutional strategies. Twelve HAPHE criteria, developed in the framework of HAPHE (Harmonizing Approaches to Professional Higher Education) project have been used as the basis for the design of the self-assessment tool (SAT) for PHE institutions. The tool has been tested in 15 PHE institutions (3 in each Partner Country) and now it is being optimized. In parallel, the examples of best practice for each HAPHE criterion are collected and will be made available for the wider public. The project will, inter alia, foster improved collaboration between PHEIs and enterprises, increase the choice of learning pathways available to students, in particular strengthening ‘dual’ options involving a mixture of studies and work experience such as apprenticeships and contribute towards addressing skill-shortages in key technical areas of employment. The project will also make recommendations to national policy-makers as to measures to improve and enhance cooperation between academia and enterprises. At EU level, the project will facilitate exchange of practice and increased cooperation between Institutions and Associations of Professional Higher Education.

Green Skills for Sustainable Development: the SUSDEV project

Green Skills for Sustainable Development: the SUSDEV project by Marek Frankowicz, Stefan Ignar, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_FRANKOWICZ-IGNAR.pdf (2.2 MB) -

The main objective of the Erasmus+ Capacity Building SUSDEV project is to enhance the role of Higher Education Institutions in ensuring sustainable development of industry and society, support of national “green policies” in Russian Federation and Kazakhstan and promotion of “green culture” by means of Lifelong Learning. Specific objectives are: development of modules to foster green skills for different target groups and qualifications levels, enhancement of access of target groups to open education resources, promotion of LLL, enhancement of green culture and continuing education through training of teaching staff, external stakeholders and public administration.The project consortium wishes to synthesize - In one project - four important strands of higher education modernization, related with both EHEA priorities and national needs: -1.Curricular reform based on learning outcomes and introduction of qualification frameworks - 2.Development of lifelong learning and increased role of universities as “LLL integrators” -3.Development of new teaching and learning methodologies and support tools, including Open Educational Resources - 4.Increased importance of “green skills” in education and work. The project consortium wishes to combine “four in one”: to promote green skills through lifelong learning channels and using new IT possibilities, starting from results of previous projects concerning curriculum development and sectoral qualifications frameworks for three complementary subject areas conditioning better quality of life (ecology, food sciences and land management).

Tackling the disconnect between universities, Small businesses and graduates in cities and regions

Tackling the disconnect between universities, Small businesses and graduates in cities and regions by Martin Edmondson, Amy Ward, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_EDMONDSON-WARD.pdf (1.1 MB) -

A review of the challenges facing companies, universities and places in retaining and utilising graduate talent and remaining competitive in the face of the 4th industrial revolution. Gradcore have been trying to understand the impact of graduates on economic growth for the last decade, and have developed some key principles: • Graduate utilisation is as important as graduate retention, • The disconnect between graduates and SMEs is two-way, • Graduate underemployment compromises productivity, • Graduates, appropriately used, create innovation and growth in businesses and economies, • Graduate recruitment processes should be designed to develop employability. Bearing all of this in mind, we asked: How can you turn a city or area into a graduate scheme, and better connect small businesses, universities and graduates, and equip them for the future? We created a pilot ‘city graduate scheme’ in 2011 in Sheffield. The scheme involves a partnership between the 2 universities in the city (University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University), Gradcore and local government. Workshop content: • Challenges faced: Graduate retention, economic growth, skills development, SME leadership, enhancement and upskilling, • Outline of the model: Creation of a city wide brand, graduate recruitment methods for hundreds of SMEs and multiple universities through one single process, • Results : How we have made more than 6000 graduates more employable, supported more than 300 SMEs and generated a £6:1 return on investment for the local economy, • Lessons learned: Case study on applying the model in a second city with a different economic context. Learning on how this might apply in particular to areas such as digital skill shortages and future economic changes.

Work Based Learning Partnerships between Higher Education Institutes and External Employer Organisations

Work Based Learning Partnerships between Higher Education Institutes and External Employer Organisations by Oran Doherty, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_DOHERTY.pdf (0.2 MB) -

Higher education institutes (HEIs) and external employer organisations are increasingly recognising the benefits of engaging in work based learning (WBL) partnerships. WBL partnerships involve colleges and universities collaborating with an employer (or group of employers) in the design and delivery of an academic programme. The learners are normally employed in the employer organisation and the programme addresses the needs of the employer and employees. Traditionally colleges and universities addressed the needs of those seeking employment but now need to consider the needs of those in employment, because of an increasing emphasis on knowledge, changing work conditions, new work requirements and an extended working life. Not only is WBL beneficial to the employer, employee and the HEI, but the State can also gain through improved economic performance. However, significant challenges associated with this form of engagement has meant such partnerships are not as widespread as they could be. The purpose of this workshop is to consider the challenges presented to both the employer and HEI and to make recommendations to improve the experiences of the three stakeholders (employer, HEI and employee/learner). The breakout session will present numerous practical steps the HEI and employer organisation can take to ensure a successful WBL partnership. This interactive workshop will examine best practice in relation to programme design, delivery, assessment, coordination and evaluation. A number of sample WBL programmes will be considered throughout the session. Workshop participants will be expected to contribute by identifying challenges and facilitators in relation to WBL partnerships and sharing best practice ideas. This interactive workshop will involve the audience participating by identifying barriers and facilitators to higher education institutes and external employers collaborating in work based learning partnerships. Practical examples from a number of different disciplines will be provided and workshop participants will be encouraged to share examples.

Work Based Learning Partnerships between Higher Education Institutes and External Employer Organisations – material

Work Based Learning Partnerships between Higher Education Institutes and External Employer Organisations - material by Oran Doherty, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_DOHERTY_material.pdf (1.6 MB) -

Higher education institutes (HEIs) and external employer organisations are increasingly recognising the benefits of engaging in work based learning (WBL) partnerships. WBL partnerships involve colleges and universities collaborating with an employer (or group of employers) in the design and delivery of an academic programme. The learners are normally employed in the employer organisation and the programme addresses the needs of the employer and employees. Traditionally colleges and universities addressed the needs of those seeking employment but now need to consider the needs of those in employment, because of an increasing emphasis on knowledge, changing work conditions, new work requirements and an extended working life. Not only is WBL beneficial to the employer, employee and the HEI, but the State can also gain through improved economic performance. However, significant challenges associated with this form of engagement has meant such partnerships are not as widespread as they could be. The purpose of this workshop is to consider the challenges presented to both the employer and HEI and to make recommendations to improve the experiences of the three stakeholders (employer, HEI and employee/learner). The breakout session will present numerous practical steps the HEI and employer organisation can take to ensure a successful WBL partnership. This interactive workshop will examine best practice in relation to programme design, delivery, assessment, coordination and evaluation. A number of sample WBL programmes will be considered throughout the session. Workshop participants will be expected to contribute by identifying challenges and facilitators in relation to WBL partnerships and sharing best practice ideas. This interactive workshop will involve the audience participating by identifying barriers and facilitators to higher education institutes and external employers collaborating in work based learning partnerships. Practical examples from a number of different disciplines will be provided and workshop participants will be encouraged to share examples.

A broader perspective for the EHEA

A broader perspective for the EHEA by Hans Daale, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_DAALE.pdf (0.2 MB) -

The ‘market’ for education providers at the higher levels is changing. That process has not ended yet... it just has started. Of course, there are the formal degrees in the European Higher Education Area. But since the introduction of the European Qualifications Framework in 2008 more and more member states are using a National Framework (NQF) for linking other types of qualifications to their higher levels. HE cycles can be linked automatically to them (levels 5 till 8 of the EQF), as formal education. But providers of non-formal qualifications can have them recognized by a ‘national coordination point’, looking at the learning outcomes at a certain level. The most interesting case is the position of VET providers, offering qualifications by using work-based learning. Those programs can be designed close to the actual needs of (dynamic) sectors of the labour market, based on certain types of professions. But the market for so-called Business Academies is also growing, offering tailor-made programs for companies. They are able to have more status by mentioning the NQF level on the diploma or certificate. Besides that, apprenticeships are being seen in several countries as a solution for growing rates of youth unemployment, stimulated by the government by having agreements with employers’ organizations. One of the consequences of these developments is the emergence of new types for diplomas, also international, at a level equivalent to 5 or higher of the EQF. What does this mean for Higher Education Institutions, like a UAS? Should they also shift their focus to the provision of non-formal education, by broadening their ‘port-folio’ of qualifications? In this breakout session, a glimpse into the future of lifelong learning...

University Fourth Mission. Spin-offs and Academic Entrepreneurship: a theoretical review through the variety of definitions

University Fourth Mission. Spin-offs and Academic Entrepreneurship: a theoretical review through the variety of definitions by Augusto Cocorullo, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_COCORULLO.pdf (0.6 MB) -

Purpose of this paper: Universities are now considered to be vital players in the process of the transferring of knowledge, innovation and technology from the academic to the commercial/productive sector. If in the past universities covered this role by granting patents to outsiders, the situation has deeply changed. Today academic institutions are also dedicated to the creation and promotion of spin-offs and start-ups, as a response to the social pressures on accountability and dialogue with economic world through the sharing of scientific research results. This paper analyzes the existing definitions of University Spin-offs (USOs) in order to systematize them and to identify the possible criteria for classifying the different aspects of this multi-headed concept. Plan/methodology/approach: The research will present a review of existing national and international literature on the subject in order to outline the theoretical framework within which the whole survey will then be placed, using a qualitative methodology. Findings: The different definitions of USOs, which are not explicitly clarified by the authors, cover a big variety of phenomena and this is a problem for the comparability of the different researches. What is original/value of paper: Define a typology of the different USOs.

IUT of Nantes and the Factory of the Future / Industry4.0 in machining / Cyber Physical production System

IUT of Nantes and the Factory of the Future / Industry4.0 in machining / Cyber Physical production System by Olivier Cardin, Mathieu Ritou, Victor Godreau, Fabrice Brau, Sebastien Le Loch, Benoit Furet, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_CARDIN-etal.pdf (9.5 MB) -

The Institute of Technology of Nantes University develops many Industrie4.0 activities, from the manufacturing process to the production activity control. This contribution aims at presenting a full scope of those activities: design, control and manufacturing. The general objective of the Institute is to train graduate and undergraduate students from Bachelor to PhD on several industrial fields: Logistics, Mechanical engineering, Materials science, Energy management and Electronics. The teaching is based on the use of many experimental platforms in a shopfloor of 1500 m.. Examples of European or National research projects will be presented together with industrial transfer and education activities. These include: practical works of robotics and vibration monitoring for undergraduate students; datamining in manufacturing with the support of EmmaTools; use of robotics in classical and additive manufacturing; machine learning and advanced PLM; implementation and evaluation of Cyber-physical Production Systems on a digital factory experimental platform. An insight about the integration of digital technologies in future design methodologies will also be presented: digital composite manufacturing platform, concurrent engineering with 3D Experience, Bring Your Own Device design platform and a multidisciplinary 3D design platform.

Updating curricula in response to labor market needs

Updating curricula in response to labor market needs by Dimitar Dimitrov, Mariana Ivanova, Petar Petrov, Patricia Georgieva, Ekaterina Arabska, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_ARBASKA-etal.pdf (3.7 MB) -

The paper presents the results from the implementation of the project “Updating curricula in University of agribusiness and rural development (UARD) in response to labor market needs” carried out by UARD under the Human Resources Development Operational Program 2007 – 2013 in Bulgaria, co-financed by the European Social Fund of the EU. The main purpose of the project was curricula development for acquiring knowledge, skills and competences to raise the quality of training and the employability of students. The project method was based on need analyses and inclusion of business/employers representatives in identifying key skills and competences needed by the graduates. This enabled the project team to develop a new, competence-based approach to the design of programs, tools for program design and teams of the university departments in updating existing curricula. The project main outcomes included new and updated curricula with the active participation of employers, and more open and transparent process of program and course monitoring. This led to an improved quality assurance of program design and approval across departments and the institution as a whole. One of the project side effects has been the improved student participation in internships in companies which was also connected to the project on student practices and internships continuing in the new program period 2014-2020 too. The project experience helped us better understand the advantages of competence-based approaches to development of university curricula and to apply them successfully now. The practices could be transferred to other institutions in order to be implemented, further developed and improved.

Updating curricula in response to labor market needs – paper

Updating curricula in response to labor market needs - paper by Dimitar Dimitrov, Mariana Ivanova, Petar Petrov, Patricia Georgieva, Ekaterina Arabska, Version 2017, EURASHE_AC_LeHavre_170330-31_pres_ARBASKA-etal_paper.pdf (0.1 MB) -

The paper presents the results from the implementation of the project “Updating curricula in University of agribusiness and rural development (UARD) in response to labor market needs” carried out by UARD under the Human Resources Development Operational Program 2007 – 2013 in Bulgaria, co-financed by the European Social Fund of the EU. The main purpose of the project was curricula development for acquiring knowledge, skills and competences to raise the quality of training and the employability of students. The project method was based on need analyses and inclusion of business/employers representatives in identifying key skills and competences needed by the graduates. This enabled the project team to develop a new, competence-based approach to the design of programs, tools for program design and teams of the university departments in updating existing curricula. The project main outcomes included new and updated curricula with the active participation of employers, and more open and transparent process of program and course monitoring. This led to an improved quality assurance of program design and approval across departments and the institution as a whole. One of the project side effects has been the improved student participation in internships in companies which was also connected to the project on student practices and internships continuing in the new program period 2014-2020 too. The project experience helped us better understand the advantages of competence-based approaches to development of university curricula and to apply them successfully now. The practices could be transferred to other institutions in order to be implemented, further developed and improved.

Training Art and Design Researchers in Participation for Public Space

Training Art and Design Researchers in Participation for Public Space by Veerle Van der Sluys, Selina Schepers, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-WS6-LUCA-2017-15-03.pdf (1.4 MB)

Research in Robotics: Experience and Perspectives at Kauno Kolegija / University of Applied Sciences (Lithuania)

Research in Robotics: Experience and Perspectives at Kauno Kolegija / University of Applied Sciences (Lithuania) by Danielius Adomaitis, Nijolė Zinkevičienė, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-WS5-Adomaitis-Zinkeviciene-2017-15-03.pdf (1.9 MB)

Universities of Applied Sciences HORIZON 2020 and Beyond Living and Working in the 21st Century Best Practice

Universities of Applied Sciences HORIZON 2020 and Beyond Living and Working in the 21st Century Best Practice by Nina J Zugic, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-WS3-Zugic-2017-15-03.pdf (0.4 MB)

EU projects in practise – Bioeconomy in EU and in Finland

EU projects in practise - Bioeconomy in EU and in Finland by Kirsi Knuuttila, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-WS2-Knuuttila-2017-15-03.pdf (1.3 MB)

Strengthening practice oriented health research in The Netherlands

Strengthening practice oriented health research in The Netherlands by Jacky Bax, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-WS1-Bax-2017-15-03.pdf (0.3 MB)

Towards the EU Research & Innovation Programme after 2020

Towards the EU Research & Innovation Programme after 2020 by Brendan Hawdon, Version 2017, UAS4EUROPE-EC-Hawdon-2017-15-03.pdf (1.7 MB)

L’évaluation dans les instituts universitaires de technologie (IUT) un processus unique dans le système universitaire français – FR

L’évaluation dans les instituts universitaires de technologie (IUT) un processus unique dans le système universitaire français - FR by Armelle Motte, Version 2017, EURASHE_sem_QA_170206-07_pres_MOTTE.pdf (0.3 MB)

Regional foundations of Austrian UAS and their contribution to regional development

Regional foundations of Austrian UAS and their contribution to regional development by Michael Roither, Version 2016, EURASHE_sem_reg_dev_Bratislava_06-07122016_pres_Roither.pdf (2.8 MB)