Asociación Europea de Instituciones de Educación Superior – ES

Asociación Europea de Instituciones de Educación Superior - ES by EURASHE, Basilia Marchandise Ruiz, Version 2015, 151020-23 REDue buenos aires BMR_ppt.pdf (2.1 MB)

The revised ESG, a suitable tool for the modernisation of universities? QA & diversified HE provisions

The revised ESG, a suitable tool for the modernisation of universities? QA & diversified HE provisions by Stefan Delplace, Version 2015, 150604 internationalisation nicosia SD_pres DELPLACE.pdf (0.8 MB)

Short-Cycle Higher Education in Slovenia

Short-Cycle Higher Education in Slovenia by Alicia-Leonor Sauli-Miklavčič, Version 2014, 140213-14 CHAIN5 amsterdam HD AS_pres SAULI-MIKLAVCIC.pdf (0.8 MB)

EURASHE introduction

EURASHE introduction by Alexandre Wipf, Version 2013, EURASHE_repr_130912_ADA_pres_WIPF.pdf (0.9 MB) - EURASHE is the European association of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that offer professionally oriented programmes and are engaged in applied and profession-related research within the Bologna cycles. Currently, more than 1,400 higher education institutions in 40 countries within and outside the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) are affiliated to EURASHE. The Association is present mostly through National Associations of Higher Education Institutions and individual institutions, such as Universities, (University) Colleges and Universities of Applied Sciences, as well as through other professional associations and stakeholder organisations active in the field of higher education.
The mission of EURASHE is to promote the interests of European professional higher education. Specifically, we:
·         contribute to the creation of a European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
·         promote the transnational cooperation between members;
·         provide a platform for members to obtain and exchange information on the future development of higher education;
·         ensure and safeguard the cooperation between members of EURASHE and institutions outside the European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
·         achieve cooperation in the field of higher education by establishing close links with other organisations that have similar objectives.

QA & Accreditation newest trends

QA & Accreditation newest trends by Stefan Delplace, Version 2013, EURASHE_repr_130912_ADA_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (1.7 MB) -

Quality Assurance (QA) is one of the 10 action lines in the Bologna Process. It was mentioned since 1999 and repeated many times since.
The national quality assurance systems vary in each of the 47 countries member of the Bologna Process:  There is no European QA, but the European Standard Guideline (ESG) provide a framework for good practice shared by the whole European higher education area (EHEA). The accreditation bodies are in charge of QA but how to ensure that they are careful: QA must be internal and external.
PHE faces specific issues when it comes to QA and accreditation. QA was developed later than in academic education as it came mainly from external QA, internal QA was much less developed. They have different requirement than academic universities, when it comes to practice, work placements etc. EURASHE feels more PHE features should be added in the ESG and started it PHExcel Project.

Quality management at Polish higher education institutions: new regulations and examples of good practice

Quality management at Polish higher education institutions: new regulations and examples of good practice by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121211-13_AMAQUEN_pres_FRANKOWICZ_2.pdf (1.3 MB) - Quality assurance (QA) is fundamental to maintain trust in higher education institutions (HEI). It can be performed internally to improve the quality of teaching and learning or externally to ensure compliance with national and European standards.
In Poland, the QA mechanisms were put in place in the 90's. In 2001, Poland joined the Bologna process and adapted its structure to develop its national qualification framework (NQF). Academic accreditation is awarded by the University Accreditation Commission (UAC), based on accreditation standards, site visits and reports from the HEI. A new decree is to come into effect in 2011.
The QA procedures are described, and the case study of the Jagiellonian University is presented.

Professional Higher Education in Europe: state of the art and emerging trends

Professional Higher Education in Europe: state of the art and emerging trends by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121211-13_AMAQUEN_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (0.6 MB) -

We observe two trends in professional higher education (PHE). On one hand, some institutions are trying to become more academic, while other insist on what differentiates them from traditional universities. PHE is at the crossroads of academic HE and higher vocational education and training (VET), it can offer bridges between them for a more consistent European Higher Education Area (EHEA).
Reckoning the importance of PHE and its changing features, the HAPHE project tries to harmonise approaches to professional higher education in Europe, strengthen PHE, enhance its quality and raise awareness on its importance. The project already produced the most extensive PHE survey to date, the profile of PHE in 15 countries, a collection of good practices, a definition and a mapping of PHE:


 

Teaching and Learning at Kauno Kolegija/University of Applied Sciences

Teaching and Learning at Kauno Kolegija/University of Applied Sciences by Nijole Zinkeviciene, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121203_HighGroup_pres_ZINKEVICIENE.pdf (5.5 MB) - The Kauno Kolegija, is a professional higher education institutions (PHEI) of Lithuania since 2000. As such, it offers high quality highereducation studies oriented to professional activity, learner's and society needs and participation of teaching staff and students in applied research and experimental (social,cultural) development activity.
The teaching and learning takes place at three level, the didactic level (classes), the project level and the level of research and development. At every level, Kauno Kolegija has excellent practice with proven results. Their chocolates are famous, they have intense cooperation with local businesses in chemistry etc.
The College is well recognised for its excellency, variety and its attractive learning environment. It offers lifelong learning opportunities. The internal quality assurance is well developed.
To continue improve in the field of PHE, the European Commission could support research conducted in Universities of Applied Sciences. It is important to encourage to business-higher education cooperation as much as possible, offer better possibilities for short term mobility.

Life-long Learning & Recognition Key Priorities within European Professional Higher Education Development

Life-long Learning & Recognition Key Priorities within European Professional Higher Education Development by Michal Karpíšek, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121203_ASIIN_pres_KARPISEK.pdf (3.7 MB) - EURASHE has a long standing interest for lifelong learning (LLL), it is part of its main mission, it is the topic of a specific working group and at the core of many of its policy papers. LLL is also at the center of concerns in the EU: The commission and EUA (European universities association) for instance published a lot on the topic. It is seen as a key to growth, jobs and full participation in society ,ageing societies,skills deficits, globalisation. It offers benefits for individuals, enterprises, economy and society. It is now a key aspect of social policy, linking education, social security and employment.
Today, in the knowledge society, the labour market requires more and more graduates, and offer very responsive, competitive work environment. Workers have to be be flexible, constantly updating their skills and knowledge.
EURASHE wonders how to help higher education institutions (HEI), and particularly professional higher education institutions (PHEI) to meet today's and tomorrow's challenges regarding LLL. The FLLLex project (The Impact of Life Long Learning Strategies on Professional Higher Education in Europe) offers some answers to those questions, showing that LLL has a huge impact on HEI and that good practices must be shared as the level of implementation and of incentives varies greatly.
EURASHE commits to:
- Flexible HE systems & programmes with different entry and exit points
- Promotion of Lifelong learning as an aspect of PHE
- Diversified HE systems to accommodate a variety of requirements, expectations, capacity
- Role of qualifications frameworks & learning outcomes, Promotion of Recognition of PriorLearning, its coordination & transparency
-Data and understanding to different elements promoting employability of graduates
- Enhanced communication with employers & other stakeholders
To support LLL, EURASHE focused specifically on recognition of prior learning (RPL) in 2012.

Quality of Mobility in Higher Education (2)

Quality of Mobility in Higher Education (2) by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121201_Transp_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (2.1 MB) - Human being have always been mobile. It was thus natural that it became an important part of teaching, since the Antiquity and the middle age. International mobility is at the center of the Bologna Process. Along to lifelong learning, lifelong mobility is an objective of education, to ensure graduates stay flexible and reactive.
To ensure the quality of mobility programmes, many elements should be taken into account. The quality of teaching in the institutions organising the exchange, a mobility friendly curriculum, the presence of staff specialised in international competence, multiculturalism. For the individual, it a good personal preparation, academically, socially, logistically, for the language and culture etc. If one wants to increase the number of exchange, it is importance to increase staff and infrastructure capacity as not to impair quality.
The European offers many mobility opportunities, but other bilateral agreements can be established. Other foundations also offer mobility programmes.
In the future, many aspects of mobility could still be improved. The administrative services have to support mobility, and be trained for it; the curricula can be adapted to encompass mobility; information should be widely disseminated. It is important tha those mobility programmes not only address students but also teachers.

Higher Education & Labour Market

Higher Education & Labour Market by Michal Karpíšek, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121108-09_QFs_pres_KARPISEK.pdf (4.1 MB) - Data available on European level shows that the number of higher education (HE) graduates is raising. At the same time, the number of jobs for HE graduates is raising.
Employers are generally very satisfied with the level of skills of graduates. They think higher education could be improved by work placements and practical experience. The cooperation between higher education institutions and employers is still scarce.
In conclusion, higher education and labour market needs are in phase but structural imbalance increased, worsened by the crisis.
More and more, graduates have to accept jobs for which they are overqualified. As the labour market is more unstable, they have to constantly adapt, by themselves or lifelong learning.
EURASHE supports a diversified and flexible higher education to fill labour market needs, it supports lifelong learning, through flexible entry points and recognition of prior learning. It reckons the importance of data collection and consultation with employers to follow closely the trends in the skills graduates need.

Les enjeux de la recherche dans l’enseignement supérieur européen – presentation FR

Les enjeux de la recherche dans l'enseignement supérieur européen - presentation FR by Stefan Delplace, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121024_Cegeps_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (4.1 MB) - Depuis l’implantation du processus de Bologne en Europe, la recherche est majoritairement reconnue comme faisant partie de la mission même des établissements d’enseignement supérieur. Cependant, cette recherche fait aussi face à une série d’enjeux reliés entre autres à la disponibilité des sources de financement, la compétition entre les établissements d’éducation supérieure et le clivage en matière de recherche entre les différents niveaux d’enseignement (licence, master, doctorat et autres).
EURASHE en tant que représentant du secteur professionnel de l’enseignement supérieur dans le processus de Bologne est au milieu du débat sur la contribution des filières professionnelles dans l’innovation et le développement régional. En accord avec le thème général du Congrès «Les enjeux de la recherche collégiale », vous sont proposés des pistes de réflexion pour voir comment le Québec et l’Europe peuvent se comparer et s’inspirer mutuellement en matière de recherche en enseignement supérieur.

Since the implementation of the Bologna process in Europe, research is largely recognized as part of the mission of higher education institutions. However, this research also faces a series of challenges linked to the availability of sources of funding, competition between higher education institutions and research cleavage between the different levels of education (bachelor, Master, Doctorate , etc.).
EURASHE as representing the professional sector of higher education in the Bologna process is in the midst of the debate on the contribution of vocational courses in innovation and regional development. In line with the general theme of the Congress "Challenges of college research ", we explore how Quebec and Europe can compare and learn from each other regarding research in higher education.

La recherche dans la mission des institutions d’enseignement supérieur : le modèle européen – input FR

La recherche dans la mission des institutions d’enseignement supérieur : le modèle européen - input FR by Stefan Delplace, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_121024_Cegeps_input_DELPLACE.pdf (1.1 MB) - Depuis l’implantation du processus de Bologne en Europe, la recherche est majoritairement reconnue comme faisant partie de la mission même des établissements d’enseignement supérieur. Cependant, cette recherche fait aussi face à une série d’enjeux reliés entre autres à la disponibilité des sources de financement, la compétition entre les établissements d’éducation supérieure et le clivage en matière de recherche entre les différents niveaux d’enseignement (licence, master, doctorat et autres).
EURASHE en tant que représentant du secteur professionnel de l’enseignement supérieur dans le processus de Bologne est au milieu du débat sur la contribution des filières professionnelles dans l’innovation et le développement régional. En accord avec le thème général du Congrès «Les enjeux de la recherche collégiale », vous sont proposés des pistes de réflexion pour voir comment le Québec et l’Europe peuvent se comparer et s’inspirer mutuellement en matière de recherche en enseignement supérieur.

Since the implementation of the Bologna process in Europe, research is largely recognized as part of the mission of higher education institutions. However, this research also faces a series of challenges linked to the availability of sources of funding, competition between higher education institutions and research cleavage between the different levels of education (bachelor, Master, Doctorate , etc.).
EURASHE as representing the professional sector of higher education in the Bologna process is in the midst of the debate on the contribution of vocational courses in innovation and regional development. In line with the general theme of the Congress "Challenges of college research ", we explore how Quebec and Europe can compare and learn from each other regarding research in higher education.

Self-organization processes in the European Higher Education Area

Self-organization processes in the European Higher Education Area by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120708-10_OpeResea_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (3.2 MB) - The European Higher Education Area is a flexible, meta framework, to accomodate all the national systems. Therefore, a large place is left to self-organisation. Three case study are presented here:
- dynamics of international mobility flows,
- the concept of self-extracting quality management systems,
- sectoral qualification frameworks viewed as complex adaptive systems

In conclusion, to characterize evolution and structural changes in European higher education it is necessary to adopt a systemic approach. There is a lot of research on particular aspects of higher education using systems dynamics. However, there is a wide gap between the research on systems dynamics in HE, Educational policy makers and Academic practice. There are now favorable conditions to bridge these gaps, a valuable effort can thus be made in sectors such as quality assurance, mobility and qualifications frameworks.

European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE)

European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE) by Iva Voldánová, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120619_DASHE_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (3.8 MB) -

EURASHE is the European association of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that offer professionally oriented programmes and are engaged in applied and profession-related research within the Bologna cycles. Currently, more than 1,400 higher education institutions in 40 countries within and outside the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) are affiliated to EURASHE. The Association is present mostly through National Associations of Higher Education Institutions and individual institutions, such as Universities, (University) Colleges and Universities of Applied Sciences, as well as through other professional associations and stakeholder organisations active in the field of higher education.
The mission of EURASHE is to promote the interests of European professional higher education. Specifically, we:
·         contribute to the creation of a European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
·         promote the transnational cooperation between members;
·         provide a platform for members to obtain and exchange information on the future development of higher education;
·         ensure and safeguard the cooperation between members of EURASHE and institutions outside the European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
·         achieve cooperation in the field of higher education by establishing close links with other organisations that have similar objectives.

VLHORA Flemish Council of University Colleges

VLHORA Flemish Council of University Colleges by Marc Vandewalle, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120619_DASHE_pres_VANDEWALLE.pdf (1.6 MB) - - the profile of professional higher education (PHE) in Belgium (VL)
. overview of higher education
. structure of PHE studies
. student's profile
. mobility
- VLOHRA
. its origins
. mission
. funding
. structure
. Quality Assurance Agency

HBO5 in Flanders

HBO5 in Flanders by Sofie Landuyt, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120619_DASHE_pres_LANDUYT.pdf (1.0 MB) - HBO5 is the short cycle higher education level in Flanders (level 5 in the European Qualification Framework). It is a programme of 900 hours of class, and is s the link between secondary and higher education. It prepare students for specific professions, encompasses work-based learning and is regionally embedded.
HBO5 legislation was introduced in 2009, introducing ECTS and quality assurance (QA). in 2012, some changes were introduced, to foster collaboration between university colleges and center for adult education, but implementation was dragged down by the complexity of the text. The NVAO and VLOHRA thus started pilot projects to see how to concretely implement level 5, by consulting all stakeholders.

From the Bologna Process to the further development of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA)

From the Bologna Process to the further development of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) by Stefan Delplace, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120619_DASHE_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (2.8 MB) - The Bologna Process is a voluntary process that started in1989 in Paris and has grown since then beyond the borders of the EU. It brings together over 40 full members: the countries that signed the signed Lisbon Recognition Convention & the European Commission and 8 consultative members: EUA, ESU, ENQA, EURASHE, the Council of Europe, E.I (trade unions), BusinessEurope(employers), and the UNESCO.
The agenda of the Bologna process was first established in 1999 in Bologna then updated in Prague in 2001 and in Berlin 2003. The EU had a huge influence on that agenda, but the process is also open to the world in its Bologna Policy Forum.
In 2009, the European higher education area (EHEA) was established, consolidating the achievements of the previous decade: the cooperation between stakeholders became permanent, the mobility is encouraged, the three cycle system and NQF were put into place.
For the next decade, the focus is put on social dimension, lifelong learning, employability, student central learning, founding, multilingualism/milticulturality in the EHEA and mobility.

The Bologna Process and its Implementation in Europe and non-EU Member States

The Bologna Process and its Implementation in Europe and non-EU Member States by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120522_KAS_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (5.6 MB) - Outline of the Presentation: Remarks on the Bologna Process and European Higher Education Area (EHEA), what Bologna Principles?; The multidimensional structure of the EHEA; Three main elements of the EHEA: Learning Outcomes, Quality and Mobility. Country examples: Remarks on Bologna implementation in EU and non EU countries (Western Balkans, Russian Federation, Central Asia); Polonia, the Polish way to Bologna; Networking Networks: Bologna at the sectoral level; Example: European Chemistry Thematic Network. Conclusions and Recommendations.

From the Bologna Process to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA)

From the Bologna Process to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) by Stefan Delpalce, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120312_FLAMENCO_pres_DELPLACE_2.pdf (2.9 MB) - The Bologna Process is a voluntary process that started in1989 in Paris and has grown since then beyond the borders of the EU. It brings together over 40 full members: the countries that signed the signed Lisbon Recognition Convention & the European Commission and 8 consultative members: EUA, ESU, ENQA, EURASHE, the Council of Europe, E.I (trade unions), BusinessEurope(employers), and the UNESCO.
The agenda of the Bologna process was first established in 1999 in Bologna then updated in Prague in 2001 and in Berlin 2003. The EU had a huge influence on that agenda, but the process is also open to the world in its Bologna Policy Forum.
In 2009, the European higher education area (EHEA) was established, consolidating the achievements of the previous decade: the cooperation between stakeholders became permanent, the mobility is encouraged, the three cycle system and NQF were put into place.
For the next decade, the focus is put on social dimension, lifelong learning, employability, student central learning, founding, multilingualism/milticulturality in the EHEA and mobility.

European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE) Introduction

European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE) Introduction by Stefan Delplace, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120312_FLAMENCO_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (3.0 MB) - EURASHE is the European association of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that offer professionally oriented programmes and are engaged in applied and profession-related research within the Bologna cycles. Currently, more than 1,400 higher education institutions in 40 countries within and outside the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) are affiliated to EURASHE. The Association is present mostly through National Associations of Higher Education Institutions and individual institutions, such as Universities, (University) Colleges and Universities of Applied Sciences, as well as through other professional associations and stakeholder organisations active in the field of higher education.
The mission of EURASHE is to promote the interests of European professional higher education. Specifically, we:
· contribute to the creation of a European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
· promote the transnational cooperation between members;
· provide a platform for members to obtain and exchange information on the future development of higher education;
· ensure and safeguard the cooperation between members of EURASHE and institutions outside the European Higher Education and Research Area (EHERA);
· achieve cooperation in the field of higher education by establishing close links with other organisations that have similar objectives.

Priority rozvoje neuniverzitního sektoru v evropském kontextu – CZ

Priority rozvoje neuniverzitního sektoru v evropském kontextu - CZ by Michal Karpíšek, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120307_VSTE_pres_KARPISEK.pdf (4.6 MB) -

Development of priorities of the higher education sector in the European context

QF-EHEA after 7 years as viewed from higher education institutions

QF-EHEA after 7 years as viewed from higher education institutions by Bryan Maguire, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_120119_QFs_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (0.2 MB) -

The quality framework (QF) of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) was launched in 2005. It was welcomed by higher education institutions (HEI) at first, helping the developement of national qualification frameworks on the basis of learning outcomes. It has permitted degrees to be compared, enhancing mobility. 


Seven years later, the quality framework faces some issues, with various pressures, the competence with the European qualification framework (EQF), the incorporation of quality assurance (QA) in the QF and the struggle with the learning outcomes approach.


The QF-EHEA impacted deeply national educational realities, in the way statistics are collected, the policies are designed, the funding is organised etc.


 

Raziskava Delodajalci v bolonjskem procesu (2006 in 2011) SI

Raziskava Delodajalci v bolonjskem procesu (2006 in 2011) SI by Primož Zupan, Version 2012, EURASHE_repr_111128_SOS_pres_ZUPAN.pdf (4.3 MB) - The survey, employers in the Bologna Process (2006 and 2011)

Findings from the EURASHE survey ‘L5 – Missing Link in the Bologna countries’

Findings from the EURASHE survey ‘L5 – Missing Link in the Bologna countries’ by Magda Kirsch, Yves Beernaert, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_111110_EQF_pres_KIRSCH_and_BEERNAERT.pdf (2.7 MB) -

EURASHE's study on Level 5: the Missing Link intended to follow-up the situation of Short Cycle Higher Education (SCHE) after the 2003 TSC study in Europe; to check whether SCHE contributes to the objectives of the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training (‘ET 2020’) and Whether SCHE contributes to the objectives of the Leuven Communiqué.


The study covers the socio-economic context of SCHE, its definition and ambiguous definition regarding level 5 EQF, the objective, duration and curricula of SCHE. It goes over QA, accreditation, the use of ECTS and diploma supplements. It studies the link between SCHE with degree studies and employment, the degree of flexibility of SCHE students. It explores the link with the labour market, specifically the local one. It exposes the profile of students and teachers. 


The study led to recommendations:
- Promote strong links between L5 and HE
- Clarify the title(s) held: e.g. Associate degree
- Clarify link L4 – L5: ECVET and ECTS
- Strengthen social / societal role of L5-Access to HE for youngsters of low SES
- Organise PLAs for decision-makers as to L5 to share good practice
- Extend study to all Bologna countrie
- Link up with L5 developments across world
- Translation tool to ISCED

Quality of Mobility in Higher Education

Quality of Mobility in Higher Education by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_111017_Mobility_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (1.7 MB) - International mobility is at the center of the Bologna Process. Along to lifelong learning, lifelong mobility is an objective of education, to ensure graduates stay flexible and reactive.
To ensure the quality of mobility programmes, many elements should be taken into account. The quality of teaching in the institutions organising the exchange, a mobility friendly curriculum, the presence of staff specialised in international competence, multiculturalism. For the individual, it a good personal preparation, academically, socially, logistically, for the language and culture etc. If one wants to increase the number of exchange, it is importance to increase staff and infrastructure capacity as not to impair quality.
Many more questions should still be studied on the question of mobility, such as mobility competence, virtual mobility, intersectoral mobility etc.

The Innovation Union, Societal Challenges and Universities of Applied Sciences (2)

The Innovation Union, Societal Challenges and Universities of Applied Sciences (2) by Henrik Wolff, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110914-15_EDUPROF_pres_WOLFF.pdf (3.7 MB) - The EDUPROF project of UASnet aims at recognition for Universities of Applied Science (UAS) as a crucial Research and Development (R&D) actor. A better visibility of R&D ensure a better understanding and finally, better policy support and funding.
Society faces new challenges, such as climate change and aging population, that require new solutions. The Common Strategic Framework for Research and Innovation is a solution but will not suffice. Applied and fundamental research are necessary. For society, UAS R&D leads to more jobs, improved lives and a better society.

The Innovation Union, Societal Challenges & Universities of Applied Sciences

The Innovation Union, Societal Challenges & Universities of Applied Sciences by Jussi Halttunen, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110914-15_EDUPROF_pres_HALTTUNEN.pdf (3.6 MB) - The JAMK University of Applied Science, in Finland, is active in research and development, mostly at regional level. For instance, it coordinated the BIOCLUS project, developing innovation and research environment in 5 European regions in the field of sustainable use of biomass resources. It involves higher education institutions, regional authorities and local businesses.

Growth of Research Capacity in Ireland’s Institutes of Technology – an EDUPROF Case Study

Growth of Research Capacity in Ireland's Institutes of Technology - an EDUPROF Case Study by Tim Creedon, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110914-15_EDUPROF_pres_CREDON.pdf (3.1 MB) - The institutes of technology in Ireland (IOT) are regionally located and intend to respond to the learner, industry and community's needs. The award all higher education levels up to PhD.
Since 1992, Research and Development (R&D) is a mission of IOT. The presentation goes over the strong points and weaknesses of the strategies on applied research.

Ovidius University of Constantza (Romania), an “Engaged University”

Ovidius University of Constantza (Romania), an "Engaged University" by Nicolae Dură, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110831_Engaged_paper_DURA.pdf (6.2 MB) - Universities can be crucial actors in regional development. For instance, the Ovidius University of Constanza (Romania) not only has the human potential needed to become an important strategic engine engaged in the development of Dobrudja region but also the possibility to implement strategies to attract researchers as well as international students, including those in the process of lifelong learning.

Challenges and Goals of Short-Cycle Higher Education – SCHE reflection in European strategic documents

Challenges and Goals of Short-Cycle Higher Education - SCHE reflection in European strategic documents by Michal Karpíšek, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110826_SCHE_pres_KARPISEK.pdf (5.2 MB) - Short Cycle Higher Education (SCHE) already proved its efficiency in many European countries but remains underexploited in others. EURASHE developed its expertise on SCHE through its working group and its Level 5 project. It presented SCHE's advantages in Slovenia at the final conference of the IMPLETUM project: SCHE enhances equality, social inclusion, employability, a diversified education and labour market. It offers more flexibility than traditional higher education, at lower cost. It is much more linked to the local realities, empowering local labour markets. The presentation presented a definition of SCHE, enlightening its characteristics, advantages and the challenges it faces. It went over the importance of SCHE in European politics, and proposed recommendations for the future of SCHE, to European and national institutions.

European Qualifications Frameworks: Current State and Challenges Ahead

European Qualifications Frameworks: Current State and Challenges Ahead by Bryan Maguire, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110705_ASEM_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (0.4 MB) - There are at the moment two European Qualifications Frameworks, the Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area (FQ-EHEA) and the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF-LLL). The FQ-EHEA was set up in 2005, with the agreement of the ministers of 47 countries. It divides higher education into three cycles, intending to facilitate international transparency, recognition and mobility. The EQF-LLL was created by European institutions for 33 countries. It covers the whole formal education divided in 8 levels. its purpose is very similar to the one of the FQ-EHEA: improve transparency, comparability and portability of citizen’s qualifications to enhance international and national mobility.
They are based on learning outcomes in terms of knowledge, skill and competences, which are described differently in the two frameworks. The two pay much attention to quality assurance. Those similarities and difference create a complex picture at national level.
It leads to questions about the quality frameworks, recognition and sectoral qualifications.

The Link between Learning Outcomes and Qualification standards, with the LO as Transparency tools

The Link between Learning Outcomes and Qualification standards, with the LO as Transparency tools by Stefan Delplace, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110520_LOs_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (0.9 MB) - Table of content: 1. Quality Assurance (QA) principles relevant for a focus on LO; 2. Learning Outcomes (LO): a tool for transparency; 3. LO link programmes to Qualifications Frameworks (QF); 4. LO on institutional level; 5. LO in informal and non-formal settings, flexible ways of learning

Qualifications and Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area – The Bologna Process

Qualifications and Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area – The Bologna Process by Bryan Maguire, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110412-13_NEASC_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (1.6 MB) - The Bologna Process is a commitment by European countries to reform their higher education systems to achieve convergence, towards the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). One of the tools to ensure harmonisation and comparability of the degree is the qualifications framework (QF). It is meant to facilitate international transparency, recognition and mobility. The frameworks are national (NQF), fitting in a meta framework (the QF-EHEA) by applying the European Standard Guidelines (ESG) for quality assurance (QA). The QF-EHEA is organised in three cycles, based on learning outcomes (LO). Each cycle is composed of a number of ECTS.

Verification of compatibility of NQF and QF-EHEA – Roadmap to self-certificaiton

Verification of compatibility of NQF and QF-EHEA - Roadmap to self-certificaiton by Bryan Maguire, Version 2011, EURASHE_repr_110325_QFs_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (2.5 MB) - The European Higher Education Area Qualification Framework (QF-EHEA) was adopted in Bergen in 2005. Since then, signatory countries are expected to self-certificate their national qualification frameworks (NQF), which 8 did so far. Three models were adopted:
-Bergen: the NQF has primacy
-Berg: seeking to implement European Standards and Guidelines (ESG)
-Bespoke: iterative process
The presentation exposes when to certify, how to design the process and the methods, how to report on it band finally, how to cope at the same time with the EQF.
In conclusion, the process is driven by subsidiarity and creativity. It is important to increase cross-references to prior verification. Time pressure is potential threat for mutual trust.

RPL What about the French case?

RPL What about the French case? by Sylvie Bonichon, Basile Sircoglou, Version 2010, EURASHE_repr_101122-24_SocDim_pres_BONICHON_and_SIRCOGLOU.pdf (2.2 MB) - Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is called validation des acquis de l'expérience (VAE) in France. It recognises informal and formal prior learning acquired in various situations (professional, social, volunteering etc.). It is an individual right in French law that entitles people to gain part of of full qualification, no matter the level.
VAE has a long history in France. In 2002, a new decree puts in place two systems of recognition, for professional experience (at least 3 years) and qualifications from other countries, according to the learning outcomes of the French national qualification framework.

Beyond the Bologna Process: Creating and connecting national, regional and global higher education areas

Beyond the Bologna Process: Creating and connecting national, regional and global higher education areas by EURASHE, BUSINESSEUROPE, et al., Version 2012, EHEAConf_contribution_EURASHE_BUSINESSEUROPE_Apr2012.pdf (0.8 MB) - Higher education and research have long been among the main drivers of cross-national openness and inter-cultural dialogue. One of the very recognisable modern trends is the growing imperative of higher education institutions worldwide to internationalize – to integrate an international/intercultural dimension into teaching, research and community service – in order to enhance the relevance of their contribution to societies and their academic excellence, while also increasing their competitiveness.
In this context, the creation of higher education areas linked to geographical proximity, and – at least to some extent – cultural heritage and shared history is a natural development. But in order to achieve the desired freedom of knowledge and allow higher education to fulfil its multi-faceted mission, these higher education areas need to be connected and to cooperate with each other.
With this in mind, the Third Bologna Policy Forum proposes to focus its high level debates on four broad issues:
 Global student mobility: incentives and barriers, balances and imbalances
 Global and regional approaches to quality assurance
 Public responsibility for and of higher education
 The contribution of higher education reforms to enhancing graduate employability
Because cross-border educational activities bring into play many actors and policy areas in a country, an effective policy strategy regarding internationalisation of higher education must take into account this diversity and ensure co-ordination, or compatibility, between several policy agendas such as: quality assurance, qualifications frameworks and recognition policy; public policy for the development of education systems and institutional autonomy, understandings of quality development and assurance informed by an understanding of the multiple purposes of education, development assistance in education and policies for economic development; other domestic educational policies; cultural policy; migration and visa policy; trade policy; economic policy etc.
This paper aims to briefly introduce the four board issues mentioned above and to ask targeted questions that could start a rich and valuable dialogue between the participants of the Bologna Policy Forum. The results of this inter-governmental dialogue will be documented by the Third Bologna Policy Forum Statement and followed-up in the years to come in a joint fashion by all invited participants.

Welcome and opening of the Launch conference of the MAP-ESG project

Welcome and opening of the Launch conference of the MAP-ESG project by Stefan Delplace, Version 2012, MAP-ESG_launch_120117_welcome_DELPLACE.pdf (0.4 MB) - MAP-ESG is a joint project of four organisations, consultative members of the BFUG, ENQA, ESU, EUA and EURASHE. It intends to “map the implementation and the application of the European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance (ESG)”

SCHE in Europe – The Missing Link : Level 5 EQF Study TSC 2003-Preliminary results 2010

SCHE in Europe - The Missing Link : Level 5 EQF Study TSC 2003-Preliminary results 2010 by Magda Kirsch, Version 2010, L5_repr_101025_ETFConf_pres_KIRSCH.pdf (1.5 MB) -

In 2003, EURASHE conducted research Tertiary Short Education Cycle in Europe. A new study was launched in 2010, Short Cycle Higher Education in Europe Level 5: the Missing Link, to update and complete the first study. The study is based on an international questionnaire. It features a definition of short cycle higher education (SCHE), its characteristics (regarding financing, access, national qualification framework, duration etc.). It explores the profile of students and teachers, the transition to level 6, the use of ECTS, dilpoma supplements. Finally, it observes quality assurance in SCHE, mobility, employability and link to the local labour market.


Finally, the research proposes recommendations to better classify SCHE in qualification frameworks and strengthen the sector.


SCHE in Europe – The Missing Link : Level 5 EQF Preliminary results

SCHE in Europe - The Missing Link : Level 5 EQF Preliminary results by Magda Kirsch, Yves Beernaert, Version 2010, L5_repr_100618_Amsterdam_pres_BEERNAERT_and_KIRSCH.pdf (2.6 MB) - In 2003, EURASHE conducted research Tertiary Short Education Cycle in Europe. A new study was launched in 2010, Short Cycle Higher Education in Europe Level 5: the Missing Link, to update and complete the first study. The study is based on an international questionnaire. It features a definition of short cycle higher education (SCHE), its characteristics (regarding financing, access, national qualification framework, duration etc.). It explores the profile of students and teachers, the transition to level 6, the use of ECTS, dilpoma supplements. Finally, it observes quality assurance in SCHE, mobility, employability and link to the local labour market.Finally, the research proposes recommendations to better classify SCHE in qualification frameworks and strengthen the sector.

TSC in Bologna process: Developments in SCHE in Europe

TSC in Bologna process: Developments in SCHE in Europe by Magda Kirsch, Version 2010, L5_repr_100416_Brussels_pres_KIRSCH.pdf (0.7 MB) - The Level5:the missing link publication was published in a specific European framework. The EU member state are in charge of education, all European measures work with the Open Method of Coordination, on a voluntary basis. Regarding Short Cycle Higher Education (SCHE), many texts were adopted: Sorbonne declaration, Bologna declaration, Lisbon declaration, Education and Training 2020 and many texts on Lifelong Learning. There were the conferences of Berlin, Dublin, Bergen, London and Leuven. The Bologna signatories and the EU established to qualification frameworks, the EQF and the QF-EHEA. EURASHE was also active on the topic, in 2003 with a first publication: Tertiary Short Education Cycle in Europe then Level5:the missing link.

EURASHE studies: SCHE, Level 5 of the EQF (EURASHE experience)

EURASHE studies: SCHE, Level 5 of the EQF (EURASHE experience) by Iva Voldánová, Version 2010, L5_repr_100303_Ankara_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.7 MB) -

In 2003, EURASHE conducted research Tertiary Short Education Cycle in Europe. The sector concerns over 1,7 million students in Europe. It has a proven influence on educational achievement, especially for students from a disadvantaged background: there is no relation between the participation rate in Higher Education (HE) and the occurrence of Short Cycle Higher Education (SCHE), but a relation between the existence of SCHE and completion rate in HE. This type of education is recent, the legislation usually dates back from less than 10 years. SCHE is characterised regarding funding, place delivered,Entrance requirements, duration and certification of studies, Profile of students and teachers, Mobility, use of ECTS, QA and accreditation and transition to degree studies.


A new study was launched in 2010, Short Cycle Higher Education in Europe Level 5: the Missing Link, to update and complete the first study. The new study features a description of SCHE in 32 Bologna signatory countries (plus regions in some countries); a comparative chapter: similarities and differences, trends etc; a chapter with examples of good practice and recommendations for EU, for national (regional) policy-makers for HEIs. Compared to the first study, it adds a point on cooperation with local communities and employability


 

TSC in Bologna process: Developments in SCHE in Europe (2)

TSC in Bologna process: Developments in SCHE in Europe (2) by Iva Voldánová, Version 2010, L5_repr_100302_Ankara_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.7 MB) - The Level5:the missing link publication was published in a specific European framework. The EU member state are in charge of education, all European measures work with the Open Method of Coordination, on a voluntary basis. Regarding Short Cycle Higher Education (SCHE), many texts were adopted: Sorbonne declaration, Bologna declaration, Lisbon declaration, Education and Training 2020 and many texts on Lifelong Learning. There were the conferences of Berlin, Dublin, Bergen, London and Leuven. The Bologna signatories and the EU established to qualification frameworks, the EQF and the QF-EHEA. EURASHE was also active on the topic, in 2003 with a first publication: Tertiary Short Education Cycle in Europe then Level5:the missing link.

Introduction to Lifelong Learning in an EU perspective

Introduction to Lifelong Learning in an EU perspective by Stefan Delplace, Version 2010, FLLLEX_repr_100916_EAIE_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (0.3 MB) - Lifelong Learning (LLL) is a not exactly a new concept in the European sphere. It was first mentioned by the European Commission in 1994. In 1995, it was included in the white paper “ Teaching and Learning, towards a cognitive society.” It was very much focused on the social benefits that LLL can bring. IT became more and more important, included in the Lisbon strategy and Europe 2020.
It was also very soon at the core of the activities of the Bologna Process, insisting on it in the qualification frameworks, the creation of the European Higher Education Area etc.
OECD insist on Lifelong Learning as a factor of social inclusion. It has to be developed as such, the problem being that "lifelong learners tend to be those who have already done well in initial education".
Many other stakeholders care for LLL: Individuals, employers, governments, the providers of LLL and European organisations. EUA has a charter for LLL. EURASHE considers that LLL must be developed from the grassroots level, according to good practice and the needs of the learners. As many stakeholders as possible should be included, especially labour market actors.
In 2008, EURASHE defined priorities for LLL:
- Labour market orientation/regional development
- Strategy for LLL at HEIs / Funding
- Support services at HEIs
- Curriculum design/flexibility
- Recognition of Prior Learning
- Position in HE/progression in studies
- Methods of delivery
- IT

EquNet Conference on the Future of Social Dimension in Higher Education

EquNet Conference on the Future of Social Dimension in Higher Education by Yves Beernaert, Version 2011, EquNet_repr_111108-09_ESU_pres_BEERNAERT.pdf (0.2 MB) - EURASHE considers the social dimension as being part of a multidimensional, political and socio-economic matrix. Widening equitable access to HE is a step to a more sustainable, democratic society, for individuals with different backgrounds regardless of socio-economic, cultural or national background. It is important to engage an authentic dialogue process on the status of the social dimension, between all stakeholders: students, lecturers, higher education institutions (HEI) and their organisations / associations, providers of adult education (Formal, informal, non formal), national, regional and local authorities, services dealing with social dimension in higher education, the European Commission & European organisations, counselling and career services, social partners, foundations / charities, companies (non profit and profit), chambers of commerce etc.
I should be focused on the collection of quality data, specifically on Level ISCED 5B, SCHE (level 5 EQF ), adult students and men, underrepresented in HE.
Many tools are or should exist. Specifically, an observatory on the social dimension of higher education could be put in place, with the support of EURASHE.

Final Report from CELAN Questionnaire for Business

Final Report from CELAN Questionnaire for Business by Iva Voldánová, Version 2011, CELAN_report_Business_Needs_110713_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.7 MB) -

CELAN the Network for the Promotion of Language Strategies for Competitiveness and Employability conducted a questionnaire on the use of languages in Business. Most respondents agreed that languages were essential for their business, especially for managers. The employees are often hired for their existing language skills. Respondents mostly use EU, or EU neighbours languages. 


Most do not have a language development policy and do not train themselves their employees to the use of foreign language. Most use IT tools such as computer assisted spell checks and dictionaries and automatic on-line translation tools. Terminology database are only used by 1/4 of respondents and the Common European Framework for Languages by 1/10.


Business mostly use external services for translation and language classes for the staff and prefer certified language services providers.


Languages are used in many activities (ordered by importance): attending business meetings; maintaining international relations, traveling abroad; Presenting company, products, services; Using multilingual communications; Attending trade fairs, conferences, congresses; Preparing communication material; Interacting socially with customers and suppliers; Retrieving and using business/technical/market information; Interacting in teams/with colleagues/with headquarters; Preparing internal operational procedures; Responding to/presenting offers, bids, tenders; Managing multilingual website; Reporting: market analysis, policy documents, product development and Installing and maintaining company products abroad.

Stratégie européenne pour l’Internationalisation de l’enseignement supérieur FR

Stratégie européenne pour l’Internationalisation de l’enseignement supérieur FR by Iva Voldánová, Version 2012, CaribErasmus_sem_120420_pres_VOLDANOVA_FR.pdf (0.6 MB) -

L'offre d'éducation supérieure en Europe est de plus en plus nombreuse et variée. Néanmoins, il reste de nombreux problèmes : le taux de réussite est bas, l'éducation est peu financée, certains pays connaissent une fuite des cerveaux. Le processus de Bologne et l'Agenda de Lisbonne se proposent de répondre à ces défis, mais la crise a parfois mis à mal les solutions. Les deux sont entre autres orientés vers l'internationalisation de l'éducation supérieure, l'emploi et la formation continue. Il reste de nombreux défis et possibilités concernant la mobilité internationale hors Europe: Erasmus Mundus, FP7, Marie Curie, LLL, appels à projets ACP...
Aujourd'hui, la stratégie Europeénne est complétée par Europe 2020 et Erasmus+.


The presentation is available in English as well: https://eurashe.eu/library/cariberasmus_sem_111128-29_pres_voldanova-pdf/

The European Strategy for Internationalisation of Higher Education

The European Strategy for Internationalisation of Higher Education by Iva Voldánová, Version 2012, CaribErasmus_sem_111128-29_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.9 MB) -

 Higher education in Europe is increasing and varied. Nonetheless, there are still many problems: the success rate is low, education is not well funded, some countries are experiencing a brain drain. The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Agenda propose to meet these challenges, but the crisis has sometimes undermined their solutions. They are focused among other on the internationalization of higher education, employment and training. There are still many challenges and opportunities for international mobility outside Europe: Erasmus Mundus, FP7 Marie Curie, LLL, calls for ACP projects ...
Today, the European strategy is complemented by Erasmus and 2020 +.

Cooperacion y Movilidad Académica entre Repùblica Dominicana y Europa: Desafios y Oportunidades ES

Cooperacion y Movilidad Académica entre Repùblica Dominicana y Europa: Desafios y Oportunidades ES by Iva Voldánová, Version 2012, CaribErasmus_sem_111019-20_pres_VOLDANOVA_ES.pdf (0.2 MB) -

This is the Spanish version of the presentation Academic Cooperation and mobility between Dominican Republic and Europe: Challenges and Opportunities - Versión en español de la presentación Academic Cooperation and mobility between Dominican Republic and Europe: Challenges and Opportunities.


CaribErasmus intenta fomentar la cooperación entre las instituciones de educación superior europeas y el Caribe en una perspectiva estructurada y sostenible. Los programas de movilidad fuera de Europa se enfrentan a muchos más desafío en comparación con la movilidad intra europea : en Europa, los programas de intercambio son multi lateral, institucionalizados, las instituciones están bien conectadas . Los sistemas de garantía de calidad y de ECTS aseguran una transición facíl. Para los intercambios con el Caribe, muchos desafíos deben ser enfrentados : la cooperación está bilateral , existe poca información, poca comunicación, los costos son mucho más altos. Sin embargo, los intercambios son extremadamente valiosos como las instituciones locales pueden ofrecer conocimientos y temas específicos (cambio climático, ecología marina, la investigación de alimentos, el turismo) , y compartir buenas prácticas . La sensibilización sobre las posibilidades de educación en el Caribe se puede hacer de forma barata y debería fomentarse. EURASHE con CaribErasmus unámonos en ese tema.

Academic Cooperation and mobility Between Dominican Republic and Europe: Challenges and Opportunities (2)

Academic Cooperation and mobility Between Dominican Republic and Europe: Challenges and Opportunities (2) by Iva Voldánová, Version 2012, CaribErasmus_sem_111019-20_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.1 MB) - CaribErasmus aims at fostering the cooperation between European and Caribbean higher education institutions in a structured and sustainable perspective. The mobility programmes outside Europe face many more challenge compared to intra European mobility: in Europe, the exchange programmes are multi lateral, institutionalised, supported financially, the institutions are well connected. The ECTS and QA systems ensure a smooth transition and consistent education. When in comes to Caribbean exchanges, many challenges are to be faced: the cooperation is bilateral, there is few information, few communication, the costs for exchange are much higher. Nonetheless, those exchange are extremely valuable as local institutions can offer specific knowledge and topics (climate change, marine ecology, food research, tourism), and share good practice. Raising awareness on education possibilities in the Caribbean can be done cheaply and should be encouraged. EURASHE and the CaribERASMUS partners tried to raise awareness and join force on that topic.

Promotional Kit EU universities towards Caribbean

Promotional Kit EU universities towards Caribbean by Iva Voldánová, Version 2011, CaribErasmus_sem_110511_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (85 KB) - CaribErasmus aims at fostering the cooperation between European and Caribbean higher education institutions in a structured and sustainable perspective.
In order to disseminate the project, a communication strategy was put into place, defining target groups, means of communication and persons in charge.

Contribution of Higher Education Reforms to Enhancing Graduate Employability

Contribution of Higher Education Reforms to Enhancing Graduate Employability by EURASHE, BUSINESSEUROPE, Version 2012, Contribution_Higher_Education_Reforms_Enhancing_Graduate_Employability_April2012.pdf (0.4 MB) - EURASHE, with the input from BUSINESSEUROPE, contributed to the preparation of the Background paper for the Third Bologna Policy Forum in Bucharest (April 27th, 2012) on the Contribution of Higher Education Reforms to Enhancing Graduate Employability.
The role of higher education has evolved in the more complex societies we are living in. Society values (higher) education more than ever - pointing to knowledge as a powerful driver of change and development. Education plays a key role in the life of citizens, as it responds to the various needs of individuals and society as a whole. Understandably, more and more young people choose an education that they believe will secure their prospective employment. However, such a short-term vision may not necessarily be the best guarantee for sustainable employment, as generic skills and a sound general education background constitute the firmest basis for finding employment. A diversified offer of programs seems to respond more accurately to the diverse needs of society in rapidly changing contexts, as well as an increased mobility of students and workers.
There are challenges such as the study -to-work transition, or the involvement of businesses' stakeholders. In this context, a reflection is needed on the efforts that regions and individual countries are making to educate more employable graduates. There is a growing awareness among both governments and stakeholders that an exchange of relevant policies and experiences with other regions in the world will also stimulate global employment.