2014 24th Annual Conference: Programme

2014 24th Annual Conference: Programme by EURASHE, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_programme.pdf (0.5 MB)

2014 24th Annual Conference: Portfolio

2014 24th Annual Conference: Portfolio by EURASHE, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_portfolio.pdf (2.4 MB)

2014 24th Annual Conference: Rationale

2014 24th Annual Conference: Rationale by EURASHE, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_rationale.pdf (0.5 MB)

Diversity of Professional Higher Education in Europe / HAPHE project outcomes

Diversity of Professional Higher Education in Europe / HAPHE project outcomes by Raimund Hudak, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_HUDAK.pdf (0.8 MB) - Rationale of and background to the research project HAPHE
The issue of institutional diversity has moved to the centre of policy discussions in Europe. With such questions as how to ensure the competitiveness of knowledge-based societies and respond to the diversity of students’ and stakeholder demands and needs.
Understanding professional higher education in Europe needs to take into account the complex reality of institutional responses and the internal mix of the HE institutions’ missions.
EURASHE and its members have found that there is no real consensus as to the definition of Professional HE, with variations being found in type of institution/programme providing it, EQF levels, qualifications offered and more. The diversification of HE Institutions is only exasperating the problem. Thus, among many ‘traditional’ professional education institutions, academic drift is being observed, (‘Fachhochschulen’ becoming Universities of applied Sciences), while on the other hand, a trend to provide professionally oriented -/practically orientated- study programmes (e.g. theoretical physicists promote "econophysics") is becoming popular among ‘traditional’ academic institutions.
The consortium’s motivation, dovetails neatly with that of the European Commission, who, in its modernisation agenda for universities, stresses the linkage between education, labour market, research and innovation as strategic and crucial for reaching the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy. The commission also identifies a huge gap between graduate competences and labour market’s needs, as well as the need to improve recognition of qualifications and to strengthen QA policy and practices.
EURASHE and the consortium members have explored the field of professional Higher Education extensively through collecting specific information in 16 European countries about national PHE systems, institutional profiles of providers and through quantitative and qualitative surveys and research. Harmonisation of the field of Professional HE across Europe as a key factor in enabling and strengthening growth of the EHEA as a whole which will:
• Accelerate development of the professional education at EQF level 6+
• Improve trans-national recognition of professionalised qualifications
• Improve coordination, and collaboration amongst actors in the sector

The overall aim of the project is building a consensus around the defining characteristics and quality criteria for professional education while developing policies, implementation guides and support tools for strengthening of that sector in a sustainable manner.

The place of PHE in the current debate on the role of higher education
A key part of the modernisation agenda for higher education, as advocated by the EU, is the reform of higher education in order to meet the requirements of the labour market.
In many countries, such a reform has involved either the creation or further expansion of a type of HEI, generally known as a professional HEI (sometimes also referred to as advanced vocational education), which is specifically targeted towards this goal, or the reform of current HEIs (of all types) through the professionalisation of courses, i.e. make them more oriented towards a future profession.

The workshop outline
For the purpose of this conference, Qualifications for the Labour Market, the workshop led us to a reflection on the diversity, nature and profile of PHE institutions and the discussion about:
• Will the importance of PHE further increase and if so, why?
• How to improve HE offerings to be adequate to market needs?
• How to improve the relationship between HEIs and employers?
The HAPHE consortium has carried out a wide mapping and surveying of different approaches to PHE provision throughout EU-member states. Major outcomes of the mapping exercise will be presented in the workshop. It will be accomplished by sharing best practices on how HE institutions adapt the criteria of PHE and how they collaborate with the world of work.
Workshop participants will share expertise among stakeholders in education, enterprises and civil society on PHE understanding, definition and defining characteristics and quality criteria.

What do students need to get a job on today’s labour market and what can we do?

What do students need to get a job on today’s labour market and what can we do? by Rok Primožič, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_PRIMOZIC.pdf (1.0 MB)

The world’s first global, multi-dimensional, user-driven university* ranking

The world’s first global, multi-dimensional, user-driven university* ranking by Don F. Westerheijden, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_WESTERHEIJDEN.pdf (3.8 MB) - U-Multirank - the multidimensional ranking of higher education institutions
The first instalment of the inclusive, multidimensional ranking of higher education institutions and fields, U-Multirank, is published a few days before the Yerevan conference. In the presentation, I shall highlight the main results, show how the web tool can be used, and go into methods and motivations that explain how U-Multirank operates and why it was designed this way. Differences with other world-wide university rankings will be discussed.

Quality, Qualifications and Employability

Quality, Qualifications and Employability by Jens Vraa-Jensen, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_VRAA-JENSEN.pdf (0.4 MB) - Jens Vraa-Jensen, Chair of HERSC, The Higher Education and Research Standing Committee of Education International in Europe (ETUCE)

ABSTRACT
The presenter holds the opinion that there are many factors that have an impact on an individual’s employability: critical thinking, communication (both oral and written and in different languages), a developed intellectual capacity, social and democratic behaviour and intercultural understanding – and of course relevant, updated and useful skills in the subject you have graduated from.
In terms of employment, we are not only looking at training a person in a narrow set of skills which will risk to be outdated a few years after graduation.
All subjects and levels of education must build on a balance between what the Germans would call Ausbildung und Bildung – with the latter also providing the employee with the ability to meet new and unknown developments and problems at work, and develop solutions for them.
The labour market (the employers) will – for obvious and fair reasons – focus most on the immediately useful skills and will not necessary see the long term perspective. Thus, it can be a risky business for the long term quality and relevance of any education to involve the immediate interests of the labour market too close in curriculum development and other decisions about the content of education. External stakeholders in education can give highly valuable input, but the decisions on what to train people in should be with the professionals in education at the HEIs, based on a high degree of engagement and involvement of staff and students.

ARMENQA: Implementation of National and Sectorial Qualifications in Armenia

ARMENQA: Implementation of National and Sectorial Qualifications in Armenia by Kristina Tsaturyan, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_TSATURYAN.pdf (0.5 MB)

European Alliance for Apprenticeships

European Alliance for Apprenticeships by Alicia-Leonor Sauli-Miklavčič, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_SAULI_MIKLAVCIC.pdf (1.6 MB)

Modernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Access, Retention and Employability 2014

Modernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Access, Retention and Employability 2014 by Eurydice, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_RIIHELAINEN_paper.pdf (3.2 MB)

Enhancing Employability: Evidence from European Education Systems

Enhancing Employability: Evidence from European Education Systems by Jari Riiheläinen, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_RIIHELAINEN.pdf (1.9 MB) - The presentation will provide data on employability-related issues collected by the Eurydice-network for the forthcoming Eurydice Higher Education report "Access, Retention and Employability". It will first give a brief overview of different general approaches to employability in European countries. This is followed by presentation of the data on measures aimed at enhancing employability of graduates. Indicators include, for example, whether countries do labour market forecasting and whether employers are consulted when designing curriculum or teaching, availability of career guidance, employability-related criteria in quality assurance procedures and graduate tracking. Lastly, some issues related to employability arising from site visits to eight HE institutions will be described.

EURASHE 25th Annual Conference, Lisbon (Portugal), 16-17 April 2015

EURASHE 25th Annual Conference, Lisbon (Portugal), 16-17 April 2015 by Armando Pires, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_PIRES_2.pdf (1.2 MB)

The supporting role of innovation and applied research in creating knowledge triangle

The supporting role of innovation and applied research in creating knowledge triangle by Armando Pires, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_PIRES_1.pdf (2.8 MB)

Qualifications at EQF level 5: Benefits for career and higher education

Qualifications at EQF level 5: Benefits for career and higher education by Slava Pevec Grm, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_PEVEC-GRM_2.pdf (1.1 MB) - EQF level 5 qualifications open gates to career advancement and higher education
Cedefop’s contribution will draw on the recent study, which examines key functions and purposes of qualifications linked to level 5 of the European qualifications framework (EQF) in 15 countries.
The study shows that EQF 5 qualifications – at the crossroads between VET, HE and general education – play an important role in providing access to employment and career advancement, as well as enabling further learning and progression to and within higher education. The study found diverse qualification types awarded by a range of VET and higher education institutions linked to EQF level 5. Also, the extent to which level 5 is used varies across countries, ranging from countries with currently no qualifications, countries with short cycle higher education (SCHE) or VET qualifications, countries with SCHE and VET qualifications and finally countries with a diversified qualification landscape including sectoral, private and/or general education qualifications at this level.
Countries differ significantly in the number of programmes, students enrolled and/or qualifications awarded at EQF level 5. Numbers also vary in relation to different types of qualifications within a country. In addition, the availability of data differs across countries and types of qualifications/programmes, making comparisons difficult. Nevertheless, an attempt was made to clusters countries based on the quantitative data available and on an overall qualitative assessment.
EQF level 5 qualifications offer various access and progression routes – depending on the type and purpose of a qualification – from and to employment and to higher education. On the one hand, level 5 qualifications primarily provide access to and advancement in the labour market. Among the thirty-one identified qualification types, fourteen are primarily oriented towards the labour market; twelve qualification types possess a ‘double’ function, valued as entry qualifications for both the labour market and higher education (in some cases with the possibility for credit transfer); some of qualification types are solely seen as a preparation for further studies; eight qualification types provide clearly articulated entry opportunities into bachelor programmes.
Many EQF level 5 qualifications are designed to up-skill individuals already in employment and provide them with advanced technical and/or management skills, as is the case in the Netherlands (an example is the Dutch ‘associate degree management and health care’). Almost all students enrolled in this type of programme are already employed and are seeking to upgrade their management competences to enable them to perform team leader roles in the organisations in which they work.
Level 5 qualifications can help progress to higher education. Half of EQF level 5 qualifications in the researched countries are awarded though short SCHE programmes, which in the Bologna process were dedicated to providing an intermediate step towards a bachelor’s degree. When the qualification is part of, or closely linked to, a bachelor degree programme, progression (including credit transfer), is generally guaranteed. However, the opportunity to progress is used differently, as some cases show. In the case of CVET qualifications primarily oriented towards the labour market, progression to higher education is (often) not an explicit goal.
Learners enrolled in programmes leading to an EQF 5 qualification are a heterogeneous group as regards their prior education, age, and/or work experience. However, in many countries data on student background are unavailable. Indicative data show that EQF level 5 qualifications are especially attractive to students with a VET background, and those already in employment.

Qualifications frameworks in Europe: supporting transparency, mobility and lifelong learning

Qualifications frameworks in Europe: supporting transparency, mobility and lifelong learning by Slava Pevec Grm, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_PEVEC-GRM_1.pdf (0.7 MB)

Employability and cooperation between education and business sectors: Employers’ view

Employability and cooperation between education and business sectors: Employers’ view by Anita Līce, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_LICE.pdf (1.4 MB) - Employability has become a central topic in education policy discussions. Many countries report persistently high-levels of long-term unemployment, particularly among young people, and at the same time employers often report that they are unable to find suitably skilled candidates to fill the job vacancies. It is important more than ever that education supports students to be prepared for their professional career, and it is also essential for economic growth and social cohesion. Closer linkages between the world of education and the world of work can contribute to more informed education and career choices of individuals, higher quality of education programmes and better learning outcomes. Employers can also provide practical training opportunities which is essential for smooth transition from education to employment. During this presentation, the speaker will give insight into the employers’ perspective on the concept of employability, cooperation between employers and education institutions and the role of employer organisations, and will offer proposals to improve employability of graduates.

Quality and transparency in education-industry partnerships

Quality and transparency in education-industry partnerships by Barbara Kelly, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_KELLY.pdf (0.9 MB) - The purpose of my presentation is to set out a rationale for greater cooperation at a national level between higher education (specifically the qualifications system) and industry (specifically employers). The key premise is that effective education-industry cooperation can have major impact and support a change agenda across higher education; challenge current education practices; and enhance the quality of teaching and learning. The content is designed:
• to complement current debates regarding making lifelong learning a reality and building a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy delivering high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion.
• to support the promotion of approaches to formation, learning, education and training that are based on learning through real tasks, in real time, for real purposes, in real environments.
We will examine the above issues by considering education-industry partnerships across higher education in Ireland including the role of QQI; the current restructuring of both the further and higher education and training sectors; the Review of Apprenticeship Training in Ireland; and a greater national focus and impetus on promoting employer engagement and entrepreneurship education.

Framework of EURASHE activities: Employability agenda

Framework of EURASHE activities: Employability agenda by Michal Karpíšek, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_KARPISEK.pdf (2.2 MB)

Higher Education in Armenia Employability of Students

Higher Education in Armenia Employability of Students by Karine Harutyunyan, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_HARUTYUNYAN-K.pdf (1.0 MB)

Employability in context of the Bologna Process

Employability in context of the Bologna Process by Gayane Harutyunyan, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_HARUTYUNYAN-G.pdf (1.8 MB) - In 2007 in London ministers identified employability as one of the priorities for the period leading to the next ministerial conference in April 2009. Employability has been one of the main aims to be achieved with the creation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) from the very beginning . Nevertheless, many of the concerns still exist - among employers, students, academics, higher education institutions and governments.

2012 Bucharest Communiqué committed “to enhance the employability and personal and professional development of graduates throughout their careers” to serve Europe’s needs”. The Ministers stressed the role of cooperation between employers, students and higher education institutions in achieving this goal. Furthermore, lifelong learning was acknowledged as one of the important factors in meeting the needs of a changing labour market; and it was also highlighted that higher education institutions play a central role in transferring knowledge and strengthening regional development.
Finally, the Ministers pointed at the learning mobility as essential to ensure the quality of higher education, enhance students’ employability and expand cross-border collaboration within the EHEA and beyond.

Embedding Employability into Higher Education Programmes and Courses

Embedding Employability into Higher Education Programmes and Courses by Mike Grey, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_GREY.pdf (3.1 MB) - Mike Grey manages the EC Futures team at Coventry University which was recently shortlisted for the Best Placement Service in the UK. EC Futures currently has students completing paid placements at 128 different technical employers across the UK, Europe and beyond.
He will talk about how to deliver a successful sandwich placement scheme, service employer requirements and engage students. This will include a case study about the Global Internship Scheme, exclusive to Coventry University, run with Tata Technologies.
He will also discuss some innovative employer led modules his team delivers in conjunction with Intel and IBM. He will also discuss international experiences gained by students through Erasmus placements and Study Abroad initiatives.
EC Futures have recently launched an Employability Industrial Advisory Panel featuring key employers such as Jaguar Land Rover, Philips and Bosch; he will explain the rationale for this forum and provide examples of how this can support the employability agenda.
The session will be interactive with plenty of opportunities for attendees to discuss initiatives and trends in their regions and share best practice.

Armenian National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education and its Implementation Issues

Armenian National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education and its Implementation Issues by Armen Budaghyan, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_BUDAGHYAN.pdf (1.1 MB)

Trends and challenges for higher education graduates

Trends and challenges for higher education graduates by Jim Allen, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_ALLEN.pdf (1.8 MB) - The consequences of six major trends that Humburg and Van der Velden (2013), identified as being particularly important for the position occupied by higher education graduates in the economy and society of today, will be in focus. These trends are the knowledge society, the ICT revolution, globalisation, the changing economic structure, high-performance workplaces, and increasing uncertainty. These trends strongly affect the type of competencies graduates are expected to possess.
While recognizing that these effects are complex and strongly intertwined, for exposition purposes Humburg and Van der Velden have identified for each trend a particular competence domain that they argue is most directly affected by that trend. For the knowledge society this this the domain of professional expertise, and for the ICT revolution innovation and knowledge management. For globalisation they point to international orientation and for the changing economic structure to the importance of entrepreneurial skills. High performance workplaces create a strong demand for interpersonal skills. Finally, because of the increasing uncertainty, graduates need to show a higher degree of flexibility than was previously the case.
This presentation is focused mainly on the impact of these trends for the labour market position of graduates of Dutch universities of applies sciences (HBO institutions). The data used is from the HBO-Monitor (the annual survey among recent HBO graduates), as well as data from the international REFLEX survey of higher education graduates in Europe and Japan (Allen and Van der Velden, 2011). This is supplemented by some results from Humburg and Van der Velden’s own study among European employers of higher education graduates.

The Cooperation of Private Universities with the Business Sector

The Cooperation of Private Universities with the Business Sector by Arthur Aghababyan, Version 2014, EURASHE_AC_Yerevan_15-160514_pres_AGHABABYAN.pdf (4.9 MB)