2013 23rd Annual Conference: Evaluation summary

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Evaluation summary by EURASHE, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_evaluation_summary.pdf (0.5 MB)

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Portfolio

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Portfolio by EURASHE, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_portfolio.pdf (1.8 MB)

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Programme

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Programme by EURASHE, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_programme.pdf (0.6 MB)

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Rationale

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Rationale by EURASHE, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_Rationale.pdf (0.5 MB)

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Report – Higher Education – Making the Knowledge Triangle Work

2013 23rd Annual Conference: Report - Higher Education - Making the Knowledge Triangle Work by Richard Thorn, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_report.pdf (10.6 MB) - Although making the knowledge triangle work is a journey rather than a state that can be definitively achieved it is clear that at a philosophical level our understanding of the policy is clear and well understood.
What is not so clear is how, at an institution level, actions can be put in place that will give effect to the policy. Changes in pedagogical practices to ensure a more prominent role for work-based learning, recognition of prior learning, internship programmes, sandwich courses, problem-based learning and learning outcomes focused learning, inter alia, are clearly part of the
response needed from HEIs.
Likewise, much of the dialogue between HEIs and employers appears to be a dialogue based on a common language but not a shared understanding of the issues if the results of employer soundings on the matter are to be believed.
Whilst these matters offer significant opportunity for PHEIs to increase their visibility within higher education there is clear evidence that more traditional HEIs are reinventing themselves whilst new types of institutions are emerging and that PHEIs will also have to reinvent themselves, their offerings and the way in which programmes are developed and delivered.

The report contains the information on the conference and the reporting on the three tracks: Mission and Profile of Professional Higher Education; Innovation and Employability.

Indicators of valorisation

Indicators of valorisation by Frank Ziegele, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_ZIEGELE_2.pdf (0.6 MB) - show the aspects of valorisation and how they could be measured by indicators
list quality criteria for the assessment of indicators
give an overview on options to measure valorisation, incl. indicators used in existing data systems
analyse the strengths and weaknesses of indicators of valorisation

Profiles and differentiation of the higher education landscape and the role of U-Multirank

Profiles and differentiation of the higher education landscape and the role of U-Multirank by Frank Ziegele, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_ZIEGELE_1.pdf (2.1 MB) - characterize the differentiation of profiles in higher education, give examples for the differentiation of the landscape
show that traditional distinction university/UAS is not sufficient any more
explain the problems of traditional rankings in this context
illustrate how U-Multirank as a new international ranking system intends to address this adequately

Perceptions of Professional Higher Education in Europe – Report

Perceptions of Professional Higher Education in Europe - Report by Iva Voldánová, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_VOLDANOVA.pdf (0.7 MB) - The field of Professional Higher Education in Europe, only vaguely defined, is growing and gaining importance for the European higher education arena. More and more, higher education institutions of all kinds are starting to integrate professionally oriented programmes into the academic portfolio, and cooperation between academia and employers is on the rise. The wide variety of systems which now fall under the term of ‘Professional’ HE, makes it difficult to transnationally analyse this sector, hinders recognition of qualifications, and limits the ability of policy tools to strengthen its growth.
To address this issue, the HAPHE research team performed a quantitative survey and analyses through a wide consultation with stakeholders from education, business and society the different approaches, demands and future trends to professional higher education (PHE) throughout 15 EU-member states. More than 350 stakeholders have participated in the survey since March 2013 and delivered their understanding and views on the nature of PHE in Europe.
WORKSHOP TOPICS
• Represent the views and attitudes of a wide-range of stakeholders towards PHE
• Discuss the various perceptions and definitions in PHE
• Setting out defining characteristics of professional higher education in Europe

Higher Education Making the Knowledge Triangle Work – Closing Observations

Higher Education Making the Knowledge Triangle Work - Closing Observations by Richard Thorn, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_THORN.pdf (1.1 MB) - The presentation sums up the main message of the conference: If the world of work identifies what it needs to be
competitive, If HEI’s adopt new methods of graduate formation, then Students will be employable, society will be innovative and companies will be profitable and competitive and the knowledge triangle will work!

Public engagement as integral part of the innovation ecosystem

Public engagement as integral part of the innovation ecosystem by Vladimír Šucha, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_SUCHA.pdf (2.9 MB) - Today, with internet, the citizenship, businesses etc. can come from grassroots, online, shared by communities. That fosters innovation. It allows to link the rational and emotional approach. Knowledge is better developed together, globally. There are thus seven joint research centers (JRC) in Europe to foster innovation.

International students’ perspectives on employability in Europe

International students’ perspectives on employability in Europe by Norbert Šabić, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_SABIC.pdf (1.8 MB) - The Erasmus Mundus (EM) programme has been designed as a means to attract highly skilled students from third countries to Europe. In this sense, it is a programme that directly relates to European brain gain. However, so far there was little knowledge about what happens with students who finish their Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses (EMMC).
Since the start of the program (2003/2004) 13.957 students from over 90 different countries have enrolled in EMMC , making it one of the largest international mobility programmes in the world. The prime motivation of these students is to study at European higher education institutions, however, many decide to seek employment in Europe after graduation. Therefore, the Employability Cluster of EM, which consists of students, stakeholders and external experts, conducted a survey among EM students on the topic of employability.
Based on the work of Brown and Hesketh (2004) employability is considered as the combination of the acquired set of skills and competences and their market-related usability. Both aspects need to be present in order to enhance employability of graduates. Due to its limitation, the study did not cover employer satisfaction, instead focused only at the perspectives of students and their teaching institutions. Thus, the broader aim of the study was to explore the added value of the Erasmus Mundus diploma on the supply side of the European labour market. For this reason, several semi-structured interviews have been conducted with the coordinators of EMMC and an online survey was carried out among current and past Erasmus Mundus students.
The results of the study indicate that EMMC are successful in equipping young people with skills required in the labour market. Deficits can be determined only for competences that are more related to the cooperation and functionality within workplace. Erasmus Mundus students seem to suit the most positions that require high internationality and extended cultural competences, which is linked to the significance of foreign language proficiency and its improvement during EMMC. This outcome is also reflected in the type of jobs that EM graduates acquire after their studies.

References
Brown, P. & Hesketh, A. (2004): The Mismanagement of Talent: Employability and Jobs in the
Knowledge Economy. New York. Oxford University Press

Mapping and characterising PHE in Europe – Report

Mapping and characterising PHE in Europe - Report by Armando Pires, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_PIRES.pdf (0.3 MB) - Trends in Higher Education:
1. Standardisation– jobs are more standardised thus training also
2. Specialisation for institutions
3. HEIs growing larger
4. Diversification of HEIs
5. Permeability increasing
6. AHE and PHE drifting towards each other (binarity blurring) x3
7. AHE power and tradition favours itself (lobbying)
8. Different staffing profiles emerging for institutional types
9. RPL increasing importance of assessment
10. Finding its niche and enhancing research capacity
11. Place of learning changing
12. Increase of workload
13. Peer- Reviewed research still driver for career
14. Mobility
15. Types of research fundamental vs applied
16. Doctoral degrees remain in area of AHE
17. Employability for PHE

Professionnaly-oriented Programmes in Canada The Knowledge Triangle, Why and How it Works

Professionnaly-oriented Programmes in Canada The Knowledge Triangle, Why and How it Works by Hervé Pilon, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_PILON_1.pdf (3.9 MB) - In Canada and Quebec, the technical education is organized on the competency-based approach and on a close relationship with the labor market practices. The lecture will lead to a better comprehension of the Quebec education system and, through several concrete examples, how the different relationships between the college technical education and the companies are connected.

Employability of Higher Education Graduates in Europe: Projects, Studies and Institutional Practice – Keynote Paper

Employability of Higher Education Graduates in Europe: Projects, Studies and Institutional Practice - Keynote Paper by Samo Pavlin, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_PAVLIN_text.pdf (0.1 MB) - Over the last years the probability of higher education graduates to get a job decreased in many EU countries. In this context it is important to understand what determines graduate’s early career success and what it actually means. This issue increasingly provide a starting point for quality assurance mechanisms and governance principles at the different levels of higher education systems. In 2009, 2011 and 2012 three large international conferences, DEHEMS Network and EMCOSU project tried to provide answers to the following questions:
What is the overall idea of higher education institutions about how your studies take into account the future professional activities of their graduates?
What does higher education institutions do to successfully help graduates to make the transition to work?
Where do higher education institutions see major developmental needs?
Which are the most relevant modes of cooperation between universities and enterprises and why?

Employability of Higher Education Graduates in Europe: Projects, Studies and Institutional Practice

Employability of Higher Education Graduates in Europe: Projects, Studies and Institutional Practice by Samo Pavlin, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_PAVLIN.pdf (1.4 MB) - Over the last years the probability of higher education graduates to get a job decreased in many EU countries. In this context it is important to understand what determines graduate’s early career success and what it actually means. This issue increasingly provide a starting point for quality assurance mechanisms and governance principles at the different levels of higher education systems. In 2009, 2011 and 2012 three large international conferences, DEHEMS Network and EMCOSU project tried to provide answers to the following questions:
What is the overall idea of higher education institutions about how your studies take into account the future professional activities of their graduates?
What does higher education institutions do to successfully help graduates to make the transition to work?
Where do higher education institutions see major developmental needs?
Which are the most relevant modes of cooperation between universities and enterprises and why?

The Concept and The Initiative for E-Government Doctoral Study

The Concept and The Initiative for E-Government Doctoral Study by Mladen Mauher, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_MAUHER.pdf (2.0 MB) - The initiative "e-Government Ph.D. Study" tries to trigger international interest. The concept is based on interdisciplinary of e-Government study and research; mentoring, technology, management and administrative technology and service capacities of Polytechnic of Zagreb as a host for e-Government Mentor Capacity Network; national and international mentoring partnerships ; participation of demand side representatives (in a Triple Helix conceptual framework); added value to existing postgraduate studies. The project in exposed concretely in the presentation.

Integrating Key Competences into Post-Graduate Courses – achieving reform – PROPOUND Project

Integrating Key Competences into Post-Graduate Courses – achieving reform - PROPOUND Project by Nigel Lloyd, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_LLOYD.pdf (0.6 MB) - The EU-funded PROPOUND project is promoting the integration of key competences (particularly relating to employability) into the Learning Outcomes and curricula of university second cycle programs (Masters degrees). PROPOUND has carried out pilots in Spain, Italy, Estonia, Netherlands and UK, and has developed a toolkit for universities about how to proceed with implementing the change. It involves:
establishing links with employers (to identify what competences they require, and to design/offer appropriate learning opportunities),
adjusting the university program so that it provides appropriate learning opportunities (for example internships, projects, recognition of extra-curricular activities)
developing suitable assessment (written exams are not appropriate for key competences)
practical steps on how to get the change to happen.

Co-operation between industry and higher education – an engine for improved employability and competitiveness

Co-operation between industry and higher education – an engine for improved employability and competitiveness by Mervi Karikorpi, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_KARIKORPI.pdf (6.0 MB) - Content
• Operating environment (the crisis, demographic imbalance, youth unemployment etc.)
• CEEMET's perspective (= Council of European Employers of the Metal,Engineering and Technology) into modernization of Higher Education
• Case example: Cooperation between the Finnish Technology Industry and Higher Education Institutions

Implication of employers improves the attractiveness of the trainings and the career success of the students

Implication of employers improves the attractiveness of the trainings and the career success of the students by Sandrine Javelaud, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_JAVELAUD.pdf (0.4 MB) - This presentation is based on our experience of French Higher Education where the French Business Confederation (MEDEF) is involved in accreditation procedures for all institutions involved in higher education (HE) and professional higher education.
Our observatory of the Labour market, with data from 40,000 businesses, clearly shows the discrepancy between graduate competences and the needs of the Labour market. Since it has been clearly stated that one mission of French Higher Education is employability, we believe that all Higher Education should take into account the trends, evolutions and needs of the Labour market.
In order to fulfil this societal goal, HE must design its courses and awards in terms of Learning Outcomes; as such the advances of the Bologna process are paramount. Secondly, the dialogue between professors, University management and business leaders must be the basis on which to construct and define study programmes.
Because qualification frameworks are national when labour market needs are at once local, regional and national, each nation must reach the proper balance between these levels when designing courses. One advocated tool is the regional mapping of HE course offer.
The employability of HE graduates can only be enhanced through an increase in the professionalization of training and generic competencies: business professionals must be involved directly in course delivery to impart their experience of the needs of Labour. Paths to be further explored in that respect are Apprenticeships and in-company learning as are provisions for the validation of all types of learning.
Furthermore, professionals should be given a voice in career information. For the complete information of students who wish to further their studies, published data should include success rates as well as employability figures down to the module level.
Partnerships based on the co-definition of qualification frameworks, quality assurance and professional involvement in courses at all levels of Higher Education are the elements that guarantee that we all can deliver sustained employability for our students.

Perceptions of Professional Higher Education in Europe

Perceptions of Professional Higher Education in Europe by Raimund Hudak, Nicole Graf, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_HUDAK_and_GRAF.pdf (0.8 MB) - The field of Professional Higher Education in Europe, only vaguely defined, is growing and gaining importance for the European higher education arena. More and more, higher education institutions of all kinds are starting to integrate professionally oriented programmes into the academic portfolio, and cooperation between academia and employers is on the rise. The wide variety of systems which now fall under the term of ‘Professional’ HE, makes it difficult to transnationally analyse this sector, hinders recognition of qualifications, and limits the ability of policy tools to strengthen its growth.
To address this issue, the HAPHE research team performed a quantitative survey and analyses through a wide consultation with stakeholders from education, business and society the different approaches, demands and future trends to professional higher education (PHE) throughout 15 EU-member states. More than 350 stakeholders have participated in the survey since March 2013 and delivered their understanding and views on the nature of PHE in Europe.
WORKSHOP TOPICS
• Represent the views and attitudes of a wide-range of stakeholders towards PHE
• Discuss the various perceptions and definitions in PHE
• Setting out defining characteristics of professional higher education in Europe

Making an Impact: Higher Education and/in the Knowledge Society

Making an Impact: Higher Education and/in the Knowledge Society by Ellen Hazelkorn, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_HAZELKORN.pdf (1.4 MB) - Today, higher education institutions provide education from associate degree to PhD level, conduct research, participate in outreach initiatives, and are a source of innovation and entrepreneurship. They are emblems of nation-building; to some they are the engine of the economy, to others a critical partner in the ecosystem. Beyond imparting education, they are the source of human capital; act as a regional, national and/or global gateway attracting highly-skilled talent and investment, actively engaging with a diverse range of stakeholders through knowledge and technology transfer, and underpinning the global competitiveness of nations and regions. Some have medical schools, museums, theatres, galleries, sports facilities and cafes – all of which play a significant role in their community, city and nation. As a group, they sit within vastly different national context, underpinned by different value systems, meeting the needs of demographically, ethnically and culturally diverse populations, and responding to complex and challenging political-economic environments.
This paper will look at the way in which HEIs and systems have evolved in response to what Neave (2000) has called a further step in the democratisation of the “Humboldtian ethic”. In contrast to a time when institutional boundaries reflected a relatively simple understanding of society, knowledge systems and labour markets, as knowledge has become more complex and society more demanding, diverse higher education models have developed. The transformation from elite to universal higher education has given birth to multi-dimensional diversity. What are the implications of these developments for higher education institutions and their wider region? What role does/should higher education play, and what are its responsibilities within a broader innovation eco-system?

Mapping and Characterising PHE in Europe

Mapping and Characterising PHE in Europe by Marek Frankowicz, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_FRANKOWICZ.pdf (0.5 MB) - The findings of the first phase of HAPHE project (Work package 1 "Mapping Professional Higher Education in Europe") will be shortly presented and different national higher education structures will be discussed. Particular stress will be put on problematic issues (such as "academic drift" and barriers between academic and professional studies impeding smooth transition between both sectors. Then the following questions will be put for discussion:
What are the main trends in profiling higher education in various European countries? Are there any emerging "European patterns"?
What kinds of performance indicators can be proposed to highlight the quality of Professional Higher Education?

Professional Higher Education in Europe: Towards an emerging model?!

Professional Higher Education in Europe: Towards an emerging model?! by Ulf-Daniel Ehlers, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_EHLERS.pdf (1.4 MB) - The field of Professional Higher Education in Europe, only vaguely defined, is growing and gaining importance for the European higher education arena. More and more higher education institutions of all kinds are staring to integrate professionally-oriented programmes into the academic portfolio, and cooperation between academia and employers is on the rise. Bringing together academic analytic skills and professional experiences seems to be the most promising trend for future higher education. However, currently there is no common definition or understanding of professional higher education. The wide variety of systems which now fall under the term of ‘professional’ higher education, makes it difficult to transnationally analyse this sector, hinders recognition of qualifications, and limits the ability of policy tools to strengthen its growth.
To address this issue, the HAPHE project intends, to survey and analyse through a wide consultation with stakeholders from education, business and society the different approaches, demands and future trends to professional higher education (PHE) throughout EU-member states. The presentation will present first results, considerations and consequences.

Merging education and innovation – Croatian perspective

Merging education and innovation – Croatian perspective by Mile Dželalija, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_DZELALIJA.pdf (0.4 MB) - Current higher education, research and innovation practice in Croatia does not well fit to the labour market and, in general, to the society needs. Education models still rely heavily on conventional input oriented approaches to student learning. New technology complexities that face the future of higher education, combined with the demands of technologically literate students, challenge researchers and educators to be responsive to advance outcome oriented learning, and relevant for students and labour market. Policy of the current research system focuses its outputs to formal elements, such as number of publications in peer-reviewed international journals, impact factors of journals, and number of co-authors at publications, which has small impact on relevant innovations.
Input of this presentation will include brief description of the current education, research and innovation practice in Croatia comparing to practices in some other countries. Additionally, there will be an input on the main elements of new reforming instrument in Croatia – qualifications frameworks, including strengths and challenges during its development and implementation phase.

Introduction to the theme Professional Higher Education

Introduction to the theme Professional Higher Education by Stefan Delplace, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (0.6 MB) - The term professional higher education cannot easily be defined. Rather it is a ‘passe-partout’ word for educational programs and trainings that exist under different education structures in most European countries. However, at present, there is no sharp, generally acknowledged definition of PHE, and one shall not expect that such definition will appear soon. The only justification for such a term may then be that throughout Europe there are institutions and programs that profess themselves as profession-oriented, or want to be styled as such. This because they recognize themselves in a number of features or indicators that are linked to the predicate ‘professional’.
It is important to elaborate multidimensional characteristics of PHE, with adequate indicators of good practice or even excellence, and to make a comparative review of existing HE structures in European countries, identifying also problems and weak points of present systems. This is precisely one of the aims of the HAPHE project.

Croatia perspective of the Knowledge Triangle

Croatia perspective of the Knowledge Triangle by Sanja Crnković-Pozaić, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_CRNKOVIC-POZAIC.pdf (0.5 MB) - Knowledge and Innovation are at the core of growth in Europe, employment, well-being and developed communities. Croatia knows great challenges in that regard but also great opportunities. It intends to:
• Give a boost to competitive or potentially competitive industries – smart specialisation
• Raise the level of utilisation of human potential by providing right skills for development
• Reduce regional imbalances by creating closer links between business, education and local knowledge
• Strongly support research and innovation
• Make use of the knowledge cluster concept
The knowledge cluster concept is then further explored.

Higher education in Croatia – new challenges

Higher education in Croatia – new challenges by Slavica Ćosović Bajić, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_COSOVIC-BAJIC.pdf (0.8 MB) - Higher Education is Croatia is facing new demands for lifelong learning, mobility, internationalisation and employability. To ensure high quality programmes it is important to keep investing in the staff, the study programmes and the facilities.

The Synergy System – Building the Value Chain from Innovation to Enterprise Development

The Synergy System – Building the Value Chain from Innovation to Enterprise Development by Pat Coman, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_COMAN.pdf (5.2 MB) - The Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT Dublin) strategic plan 2009 to 2014 makes a firm commitment to support targeted research in designated priority areas to create a significant resource for regional and national industry and contribute to the success of the knowledge economy. The plan confirms ITT Dublin as a hub for the advancement of commercial innovation within the region and its desire to collaborate with research funding partners and other institutions to create a comprehensive innovation support framework for industry. It is committed to providing design, development and validation services, within its areas of expertise, to those engaged in applied research and innovation regionally and nationally, and to the growth of knowledge based enterprise through the provision of a comprehensive enterprise development package including facilities, equipment, and business development support.

Co-operation between industry and higher education – an engine for improved employability and competitiveness (2)

Co-operation between industry and higher education – an engine for improved employability and competitiveness (2) by Mislav Balković, Version 2013, EURASHE_AC_Split_130509-10_pres_BALKOVIC.pdf (1.7 MB) - 1.Cooperation: EU policy perspective
- EU 2020
- Cohesion fund
- ESG
- ...
2. How to foster cooperation: EU ICT initiative
3. Croatian examples on national level
- NQF
- Cooperative structure
- SSC
- National ICT week
4. Institutional examples