European Higher Education Area Beyond 2010

European Higher Education Area Beyond 2010 by Věra Šťastná, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_STASTNA.pdf (0.6 MB)

Employment Outcomes of Young Graduates in Europe and Japan – Empirical Evidence from Graduate Surveys and a New Approach in Germany

Employment Outcomes of Young Graduates in Europe and Japan – Empirical Evidence from Graduate Surveys and a New Approach in Germany by Harald Schomburg, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_SCHOMBURG.pdf (0.3 MB) - Based on empirical data from the CHEERS and the REFLEX study - large scale surveys with about 35,000 graduates each from higher education institutions in Europe and Japan; conducted 1999 and 2005 – the presentation will highlight the methodological approach and the key findings about the labour market outcomes of young higher education graduates in an international comparative perspective. CHEERS and REFLEX do not only provide the best genuine comparative empirical data on employment outcomes of graduates of specific cohorts (1995 and 2000) from institutions of higher education in Europe and Japan which were asked four years and five years after graduation. The data allow also to shed light on the key question to what extent higher education was relevant for the employment outcomes of graduates. Subjective and objective indicators of professional success were used in the analysis of the relevance of a broad range of educational factors (e.g. field of study, type of institution, country, reputation, study conditions, study behaviour).
Additionally, the author presents the new “Graduate Survey Approach” for institutional development at German higher education institutions. About 50 institutions of higher education intent to cooperate in this project which was initiated 2007 by INCHER-Kassel (team leader: Harald Schomburg). The study is sponsored for two years by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The project is to implement regular graduate surveys at each institution of higher education in Germany. The first pilot surveys started already 2007, and in the year 2008 up to 90,000 graduates - which represent almost 50% of all graduates of one year – are included in the survey system. In order to provide relevant information for the ongoing process of institutional development (including evaluation, accreditation, career service, student counselling, curriculum development) members of each institution of higher education are engaged in the development of their own questionnaire. At the same time it was ensured that the survey has a large component of common questions which allows fruitful comparative analysis especially of the effects of higher education study provisions and conditions for the employment outcomes of the graduates.

Mobilising higher education for cities and regions: OECD reviews of HE in Regional and City Development

Mobilising higher education for cities and regions: OECD reviews of HE in Regional and City Development by Jaana Puukka, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_PUUKKA.pdf (0.8 MB) - Higher education drives growth and innovation in cities and regions and can help them become more innovative and globally competitive. Reviews of Higher Education in Regional and City Development are the OECD’s vehicle to mobilise higher education institutions (HEIs) for economic and social development. The reviews facilitate stronger collaboration between HEIs and governments at all levels and provide regions with tools and ideas to harness the innovation potential of higher education. They draw together ‘town and gown’ and link HEIs to public and private agencies to identify and work towards strategic goals. Drawing the lessons and key conclusions from the OECD publication ‘Higher Education and Regions - globally competitive; locally engaged’ (OECD, 2007) reporting on the first round of reviews in 2004-2007 of 14 regions in 12 countries as well as the preliminary lessons from the second round in 2008-2010 which is reaching out to 15 new regions in 11 countries, this presentation highlights the economic and social benefits of higher education for cities and regions, and discusses why local and regional development is becoming more important in the era of globalisation. It highlights good practice examples on how HEIs can strengthen regional innovation systems, human capital development and social and cultural development in their cities and regions. It identifies constraints for more active engagement of HEIs at national, regional and institutional level and suggests how these constrains can be removed. Finally, it argues that the HEIs can be best mobilised for economic and social development in the context of cities and regions and by mainstreaming this work in teaching and research.

The Role of Higher Education Institutions in the Support of Regions Innovation Development

The Role of Higher Education Institutions in the Support of Regions Innovation Development by Zbynek Pitra, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_PITRA.pdf (0.2 MB) - Innovation means pursuing radical new business opportunities, exploiting new or potentially disruptive technologies, and introducing change into the core concept of the company’s business. The higher education institutions (HEI) must accept three important roles within
this innovation development process at the regions of their activities:
1. The role of an innovation ideas creator.
2. The role of such ideas distributor and a coordinator of different subjects’ effort that focuses on promising innovation project easy implementation - the role of an innovation intermediary.
3. The role of an educator, the catalyst that spreads the knowledge necessary for innovation’s successful launch to the target market among the members of teams that co-operate within the process of creative idea transformation into cash.
During playing the role of innovation idea creator HEI must respect that companies can shop for innovation in various stages of development. Because an innovation is a business phenomenon, transferring the promising idea into commercially successful output means to develop a new business model - to change the company’s behavior.
Within the role of an intermediary HEI would be in a unique position to visualize new opportunities synthesized from insights and technologies provided by several companies - ideas that might never occur to companies working on innovation programs on their own.
To fulfill the role of an educator successfully, the HEI have to abandon an education model resembling filling the bottles from the lake of knowledge and sending them along the line of users who will drink from the bottle when needed. This obsolete model must be replaced by another model:
Give the potential users boats and compasses and let them paddle on the lake of knowledge to the needed sources themselves.

Tempus contribution to University-Industry Partnership and Employability

Tempus contribution to University-Industry Partnership and Employability by Marija Filipovic-Ozegovic, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_OZEGOVIC.pdf (0.1 MB)

Education in 21st century: Globalisation, Competitiveness & the Role of Technology

Education in 21st century: Globalisation, Competitiveness & the Role of Technology by Jan Mühlfeit, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_MUEHLFEIT.pdf (1.9 MB) - Technology in next 10 years will play unprecedented transformative role in the society and will even more dramatically influence further globalization. People, organizations, states will mainly compete trough ability to unlock human potential trough use technology in innovation, creativity and design. The paradox is that more technology we will use, the human brains and people talent will be really the only one long term competitive advantage for individuals, companies and countries. The speech should encourage audience to think what implications of those trends for global competitiveness are and what Europe should do to stay among key players of the 21st century.

Social capital, citizenship and continuing education: What are the connections?

Social capital, citizenship and continuing education: What are the connections? by John Morgan, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_MORGAN_supp_2.pdf (0.3 MB) - The purpose of this short article is to consider the concepts of social capital and of citizenship, and to identify connections with continuing education, post-school education, and lifelong learning. The core of the article comprises three parts: first, the concept of social capital is considered, together with the related concept of cultural capital; second, the concept of citizenship is considered, together with the
related concept of active citizenship; and finally, using examples chiefly from the United Kingdom, the article considers the policy and practice of “continuing education” and their connections with the
theoretical concepts considered earlier.

A Challenge for Professional Associations

A Challenge for Professional Associations by Gordon Stewart, John Morgan, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_MORGAN_supp_1.pdf (0.5 MB) - Perhaps due to the fact that it focuses on the workplace itself, work-based learning (WBL) has recently gained a high profile in the United Kingdom. Whilst different stakeholders, including employers, trade unions and, of course, the learners themselves, have seen value in WBL, the part played by the professional associations (PAs) has yet to be fully explored and their potential for even greater involvement discussed.

Lifelong Learning, Entrepreneurship and Social Development: The Role of Higher Education

Lifelong Learning, Entrepreneurship and Social Development: The Role of Higher Education by John Morgan, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_MORGAN.pdf (0.1 MB) - It is necessary for us to re-think the role and purpose of the university and of higher education in the economic, political and social circumstances of the early 21st century. Indeed, the current economic and financial crisis makes such a re-assessment an urgent one.
This presentation will consider the current role of higher education from three linked perspectives: that of Lifelong Learning, of Entrepreneurship and of Social Development. It will conclude by suggesting some possible ways forward for higher education institutions as they seek to contribute to economic and social well-being in Europe.

Higher Education, Enterprises and Regions: Partnerships for Innovation and Development throughout Europe – Conclusions

Higher Education, Enterprises and Regions: Partnerships for Innovation and Development throughout Europe - Conclusions by Volker Gehmlich, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_GEHMLICH.pdf (1.4 MB)

HR and New Approaches: Development of Business School Staff, The Pulse Approach

HR and New Approaches: Development of Business School Staff, The Pulse Approach by Dan Ole Faaborg, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_FAABORG.pdf (0.3 MB) - Business schools always found it easy to define the core subjects in their programmes – hiring new staff or developing existing staff would concentrate on attracting the best academics in these classic business fields. Micro and macro economics, organisation, business law, statistics, logistics etc.
New demands for “the whole person” who can not only think and analyse but also feel, be enthusiastic, and perform and implement have raised the thresholds of competence.
Many international associations offering accreditation require accredited schools to define a set of specific goals for the development of their faculty.
Very often their interest is to see how mission and vision statements are pursued in the HR effort of the schools. A good business school will design faculty development programs to fulfill the school's mission.
What is missing in school policies is often a description of how the school can link its faculty development efforts to the achievement of its stated goals and student-learning outcomes. The session deals with a scenario of a so-called “pulse” strategy which is a model to foster the link between mission statement, business partners, goals, student-learning outcomes, and faculty-development programmes.
Level: intermediate
Form: interactive session
Speaker: Ole Faaborg, UCN Northern Denmark, Dean of Business School

Being at the cross-roads of R+D+I+B: the Károly Róbert College – Gyöngyös

Being at the cross-roads of R+D+I+B: the Károly Róbert College - Gyöngyös by László Dinya, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_DYNIA.pdf (0.6 MB) - The presentation is going to focus on the case study of a Hungarian college and its strategic orientation on research and development in the field of bioenergy and its impact on the school’s structure and study offer.

In-company training & education provided by higher education institutions: Work Group Discussion

In-company training & education provided by higher education institutions: Work Group Discussion by Michael Cholewa-Madsen, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_CHOLEWA-MADSEN.pdf (0.2 MB) - Michael Cholewa-Madsen will shortly present the Danish education system and the relationship to the Danish Insurance Academy. The academy is a private institution, which is an exception in Denmark, where all other education at all levels is a public matter: Publicly
financed, publicly assessed and accredited.
The presentation will raise questions about student learning and quality in education. The key point is to underline the goal of the Bologna process about quality in education and focus on the student’s learning process.
The main scope of the presentation is that there is a tendency to focus on differences rather than focusing on similarities in education systems across Europe. Regardless of whether they are private, public, new, old, rich or poor institutions, the focus should be on the student's learning process and the quality in education. In-company training and school education are two mutually dependent sides of the student's learning process and must be integrated and recognized on an equal basis.

Québec Cégep’s: Leaders in Regional Developments

Québec Cégep's: Leaders in Regional Developments by Michel Gravel, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_GRAVEL.pdf (2.2 MB) - Three point presentation:
Cegeps the Educational system in Quebec, tools for regional development and the Cegep of Jonquiere an example.
The Cegeps have a three fold mission: Accessibility and quality, consolidation of career choice and support for regional development. The third is the main topic of this presentation. We will look briefly at the general tools concerning the competency approach, mobility of students, structure of regional development, College Centers for the transfer and technology and funding. Concluding with the example of the Cegep of Jonquiere this will provide an overall look with its large family of programs, the Continuing Education as well as the Self Financing Departments.

Science and Technology Park: Bridge between the Science and the Business World

Science and Technology Park: Bridge between the Science and the Business World by Martin Černý, Version 2009, EURASHE_AC_Prague_090521-22_pres_CERNY.pdf (0.8 MB)