Strengthening the ties between tertiary education and the labour market

Strengthening the ties between tertiary education and the labour market by Paulo Santiago, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_SANTIAGO.pdf (0.1 MB) - The presentation reviews the main results in Tertiary Education for the Knowledge Society, a thorough international investigation of tertiary education policy across its many facets – governance, funding, quality assurance, equity, research and innovation, academic career, links to the labour market and internationalization. Its specific concern is policies that ensure that capabilities of tertiary education contribute to countries’ economic and social objectives. The report draws on the results of a major OECD review of tertiary education policy – the OECD Thematic Review of Tertiary Education - conducted over the 2004-08 period in collaboration with 24 countries around the world. The presentation will give emphasis to those aspects of tertiary education policy that are more concerned with working life.

European Credit system for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET): What is it and what does it mean for us?

European Credit system for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET): What is it and what does it mean for us? by Bryan Maguire, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (50 KB) - Following extensive consultation in 2007, the European Commission has, in April 2008, tabled a revised proposal for a European Credit system for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET). The original proposal had several features to which the European higher education community, including EURASHE, objected. This workshop will examine how the revised proposal sits alongside the revised ECTS Key Features document which was also issued in recent months. It will also consider the implications for these developments for national credit systems linked to national qualifications frameworks. As many EURASHE members cooperate closely with their national VET sector this development is particularly important to members.

ECVET & ECTS

ECVET & ECTS by Sandra Kraze, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_KRAZE.pdf (0.3 MB) - The system was created to enhance the transparency of study programmes and facilitate recognition across Europe. It can facilitate the programme design and development. It also provides a common instrument for higher education institutions and students, it meets the concept of credits .ECTS serves for both mobile and non-mobile students as it supports inter-institutional co-operation.
Through ECTS the programmes can be made more flexible, it supports learner centred approach. ECTS is a key element of the Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area.
During the workshop the answers to the following questions will be sought:
1.What are the advantages for the learner of ECTS?
2.How do you use credits for accumulation and transfer?
3.What is the link between ECTS credits and Workload?
4.Are learning outcomes directly related to activities and ECTS credits?
5.How do you decide how many credits a degree programme should have?6. How do you assign credits to different modules?
7.Do we need two credit systems?
A special focus is on credit accumulation and transfer. For national students it is a tool for credit accumulation. For international activities it is a tool for credit transfer and study period recognition, in case of agreed Learning agreement and achieved LO recognition should be automatic. When used as transfer, credits facilitate mobility within one institution or one country, from institution to institution, or from one country to country, and between different educational sectors and contexts of learning.

Lifelong Learning: the University Perspective

Lifelong Learning: the University Perspective by Michael Hörig, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_HOERIG.pdf (97 KB)

Vocational Education in a Quality Assurance Culture

Vocational Education in a Quality Assurance Culture by Maurice Grech, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_GRECH.pdf (0.4 MB)

Quality Labels for the Chemistry Graduates Enhance their Employability

Quality Labels for the Chemistry Graduates Enhance their Employability by Pavel Drašar, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_DRASAR.pdf (0.9 MB) - Three major players in European dimension of chemical education and professional activities, ECTN, ECTN-A and EuCheMS joined their forces to create widely acknowledged structure of well recognised quality labels.
The European Chemistry Thematic Network is an association which joins some 150 European universities teaching chemistry, the European Chemistry Thematic Network Association is a non-profit making association registered in Belgium and is an outcome of six years of ECTN activity; and EuCheMS, the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences is the association of European chemical societies. All three partners aim to bring together all actors in the chemistry sector to enhance the employability of chemistry graduates at all levels but particularly at the first cycle level; to enhance the professional/generic skills of students; to report on and evaluate innovative teaching methods; to develop a European qualifications framework for the chemistry sector; to identify best practices in the creation of study programmes combining chemistry and chemical technology; to create an Internet–based test for all chemistry branches; and to enhance the public image of chemistry, i.a.
Quality labels: EuroBachelor®, EuroMaster®, EuroDoctor, and European Chemist are capable to certify educational and professional levels, required educational structure, international acknowledgement, and enhanced mobility of graduates across the European (and maybe world) educational and research space as well as the job marketplace. Chemists welcome every opportunity to help in application of this scheme in any other educational and professional specialisation.

Reports of Round Table Sessions on Thursday 8 May 2008

Reports of Round Table Sessions on Thursday 8 May 2008 by Stefan Delplace, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_DELPLACE.pdf (0.1 MB)

Qualifications in a Quality Assurance Culture: Moving Bologna and Copenhagen towards a lifelong and Europewide response to employability

Qualifications in a Quality Assurance Culture: Moving Bologna and Copenhagen towards a lifelong and Europewide response to employability by Dolores Cristina, Maurice Grech, Alfred Vella, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_CRISTINA.pdf (0.4 MB)

A Europe-wide response to Employability

A Europe-wide response to Employability by David Coyne, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_COYNE.pdf (0.3 MB) - Defining Employability has been controversial, but is essential if we want to think about the contribution that professional higher education can make to the employment needs of individuals and economies. We should consider all dimensions of employability, and reflect on how these are provided and sustained. Medium-term projections of economic (globalisation, technological development, rapider innovation cycles) and societal trends (ageing, employment rates, dependency rates) suggest changes in the age- and qualification-structure of the workforce and in the skills needs of employers, which will challenge the professional higher education institutions in new ways.

VET Qualifications System Development in Georgia

VET Qualifications System Development in Georgia by Maia Chankseliani, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_CHANKSELIANI.pdf (0.3 MB)

Learning Outcomes or Competences?

Learning Outcomes or Competences? by Lucien Bollaert, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_BOLLAERT.pdf (0.4 MB) -

This latest year the learning outcomes have been the main theme of Bologna seminars and conferences. Rightly they are more and more considered to be central at the Bologna process. ECTS, (recognition of) mobility, quality assurance, employability, lifelong learning and qualification frameworks all cannot be set up and function without learning outcomes. At the same time institutions are confronted with the consequences in curricula, learning and evaluation methods and (educational) organisation. Since 2000 the learning cutcomes have been confronted with competences. The discussion culminated in the EQF and the ECTS-ECVET. Which way to go?

Qualifications Frameworks in the European Higher Education Area: how did we get there and why?

Qualifications Frameworks in the European Higher Education Area: how did we get there and why? by Sjur Bergan, Version 2008, EURASHE_AC_Malta_080508-09_pres_BERGAN.pdf (0.4 MB) - Qualifications frameworks represent one of the main developments within the Bologna Process. They describe the qualifications that make up an education system and emphasize learning outcomes - what learners know, understand and are able to do on the basis of a given qualification. Qualifications frameworks also describe how the various qualifications within a system articulate and how learners can move between them. The session will provide an overview of the development of qualifications frameworks as well as the relationship between national frameworks and the overarching framework of the European Higher Education Area and the EQF of the European Union.