Applied transdisciplinary research Doxa-Praxis Continuum as a result of applying EMMY to human thinking and acting

Applied transdisciplinary research Doxa-Praxis Continuum as a result of applying EMMY to human thinking and acting by Liviu Drugus, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_DRUGUS_text.pdf (0.2 MB)

Applied Research as a “Doxa-Praxis Continuum” The case of EMMY applied to Social Sciences and Humanities

Applied Research as a “Doxa-Praxis Continuum” The case of EMMY applied to Social Sciences and Humanities by Liviu Drugus, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_DRUGUS.pdf (0.2 MB)

Agreed European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance

Agreed European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance by Christian Thune, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_THUNE.pdf (0.2 MB) - The communiqué from the Berlin meeting 21 September 2003 of the Ministers of the Bologna Process signatory states invited ENQA through its members, in cooperation with the European University Association (EUA), the European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE), and the National Unions of Students in Europe (ESIB), to explore ways of ensuring an adequate peer review system for quality assurance and/or accreditation agencies or bodies, and to report back through the Bologna Follow-Up Group to Ministers in 2005. The Ministers also asked ENQA similarly to develop an agreed set of standards, procedures and guidelines on quality assurance.
ENQA fulfilled the mandate and submitted in February 2005 its report on standards and guidelines for quality assurance in the European Higher Education Area to the Bologna Follow-Up Group with the endorsement of EUA, EURASHE and ESIB.
The main results of the report are:
• There will be European standards for internal and external quality assurance, and for external quality assurance agencies.
• European quality assurance agencies will be expected to submit themselves to a cyclical review within five years;
• There will be an emphasis on subsidiarity, with reviews being undertaken nationally where possible;
• A European register of quality assurance agencies operating in Europe will be produced;
• A European Register Committee will act as a gatekeeper for the inclusion of agencies in the register;
• A European Consultative Forum on Quality Assurance will be established.
The report also makes it clear that its submission should not be viewed as the end of the project. What has been set in motion by the Berlin mandate will need continuing maintenance and coaxing if it is to provide the fully functioning European dimension of quality assurance for the European Higher Education Area. However, a European Higher Education Area with strong, autonomous and effective higher education institutions, a keen sense of the importance of quality and standards, good peer reviews, credible quality assurance agencies, an effective register and increased co-operation with other stakeholders, such as employers, is now possible and the proposals contained in the report will go a long way towards making that vision a reality.

Development of non-university higher education in Lithuania

Development of non-university higher education in Lithuania by Romualdas Pusvaskis, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_PUSVASKIS.pdf (0.3 MB) - The current situation of college / polytechnics sector in Lithuania is analyzed. A brief history of development of this sector is presented, the process of establishment of colleges is described, as well as legal basis and procedure of evaluation/accreditation. The difficulties of establishment the binary system in higher education and the perspectives of college / polytechnics sector are analyzed, as well as the
general situation of the implementation of Bologna process in Lithuania. Lithuania is presented as a successful leader in Central Europe that has already actualized the main requests raised by Bologna Declaration.

A Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area

A Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area by Bryan Maguire, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_MAGUIRE.pdf (0.4 MB)

Various kinds of research: A challenge for University Colleges and Polytechnics

Various kinds of research: A challenge for University Colleges and Polytechnics by Josef Koubek, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_KOUBEK.pdf (0.5 MB) - Colleges and Polytechnics are excellent places for performing applied and output-oriented research. Moreover, research is looked at as an integral part of the teaching process at higher education institutions (HEIs) of all types and levels. HEIs are important actors in the European Research Area (ERA) establishment and its running. HEIs research should be oriented on outputs into practice and society.
Research thinking should be the most powerful tool in the teaching process. Research training should be carried out by doing research in an appropriate HE environment.
A co-existence of teaching and research is part of the HEI identity, and this is of great importance even at BA levels. A simple answer will be given to the question: “Why would an undergraduate want a research-oriented teacher?” Setting or improvement of knowledge transfer between HEIs and companies and society is of great importance . The collaborative type of research is a necessity. The concept of Responsible Partnering developed by EIRMA, EUA, EARTO and PROTON will be presented.
The crucial point of Responsible Partnering is recognition that the greatest benefits of collaborative research tend to be achieved within long-term partnerships. Trust and stability are preconditions for establishing the significant research programmes. Companies and HEIs operate according to different objectives, and long-term partnerships cannot be guaranteed by contract at the outset.
Supportive public policy measures at the local, regional and national levels are also necessary to ensure the success of Responsible Partnering through long-term corporate and institutional commitment. It is important to tailor these measures to suit local needs, but they must also be consistent in key respects across national boundaries.

Research Development in Irish Institutes of Technology

Research Development in Irish Institutes of Technology by Paul Hannigan, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_HANNIGAN.pdf (0.7 MB)

Mutual recognition of accreditation decisions

Mutual recognition of accreditation decisions by Mark Frederiks, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_FREDERIKS.pdf (4.4 MB)

Quality Assurance (QA) in the European processes

Quality Assurance (QA) in the European processes by Lucien Bollaert, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_BOLLAERT.pdf (1.5 MB) - The Berlin communiqué of the Ministers of the Bologna Process invited EURASHE to sit on a quadripartite platform co-ordinated by ENQA to produce a report on standards and guidelines for quality assurance in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The report contains a set of standards for internal and external quality assurance, and for external quality assurance agencies, which will be expected to submit themselves to national, cyclical reviews within five years. A European register of quality assurance agencies operating in Europe will be established with a committee as gatekeeper and a European Consultative Forum on Quality Assurance as steering group. The submission of the report does not mean the end of the project. There is still work to do to turn the report into reality. EURASHE has co-operated firmly in the quadripartite platform and made clear its own points of view, stressing the involvement of all stakeholders, such as employers and students, on all levels. EURASHE has often felt as a bridge between the academic partners, the students, the European director general and stakeholders, such as the employers of graduates.
Meanwhile the Bologna process has come up with other important elements in order to build the EHEA, such as the Qualification Framework on higher education and the international recognition of degrees. The Copenhagen process is working on a even wider European Qualification Framework where higher education and professional and vocational training will be recognized and validated. Competences seem to be able to bridge the gap between ECTS, VET and learning outcomes. Quality assurance and accreditation are sure to play a key role in the establishment of international trust as necessary foundation of the future Europe.

Quality Assurance in Lithuanian Higher Education. Comparative Analysis of Non-University and University Study Evaluation

Quality Assurance in Lithuanian Higher Education. Comparative Analysis of Non-University and University Study Evaluation by Eugenijus Stumbrys, Almantas Šerpatauskas, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_STUMBRYS_and_SERPATAUSKAS.pdf (5.3 MB) - Quality Assurance of Lithuanian Higher education was started when the Centre for Quality Assessment in Higher Education has been established in 1995. There are three types of assessment in Higher Education in Lithuania: assessment of study programmes; assessment of research and development; general qualitative assessment of Higher Education Institutions.
The regular evaluation of study programmes was started in 1999. At that time only university type study programmes were assessed by the Centre. The evaluation of non-university study programmes was started at the end of 2001. The reason why non-university study programmes were started to be assessed later is that non-university studies were introduced in Lithuania only in 2000. Until now the Centre assessed quality of 473 study programmes. Among them there were only 22 nonuniversity study programmes assessed. This big difference in assessed programmes comes from the fact that non-university study programmes were started to be evaluated a few years later. The other reason is that there are ~300 non-university programmes in the State Registry and almost 1000 university level programmes. The purpose of the study programme assessment is accreditation – estimation how the programmes meets legal requirements and main accreditation criteria. The Centre also performs an institutional assessment of Colleges. It started at the end of 2004. At the moment only institutional assessment of Colleges is performed. The institutional assessment of University type institutions is not started yet.
Assessment of study programmes starts with the annual plan indicating which study programmes will be assessed. Each year the Centre evaluates study programmes of 5-8 study areas (approx. 150 study programmes in total). Colleges and universities presents the self assessment reports to the Centre which composes an expert team (of local or international experts) to assess the programmes. Expert team analyses a self-assessment report of the HEI. One of the most important stages in assessment procedures is experts’ site visit to the Higher Education institution. After site visit experts submit the draft report of external assessment to an assessed institution of research and higher education which within 10 days may indicate in written form the experts' mistakes found and make an argued suggestion to change certain conclusions and recommendations of the assessment. On receiving these remarks from the assessed institution of research and higher education, the experts prepare the final external assessment report and submit it to the Centre. The final assessment report is then submitted to the Experts‘ Council which evaluates the assessment report and gives recommendations on accreditation.
The final decision on accreditation is taken by the Minister of Science and Education.

Quality Assurance in Higher Education and Training in Ireland

Quality Assurance in Higher Education and Training in Ireland by Orlaith Mc Caul, Version 2005, EURASHE_AC_Vilnius_050428-29_pres_MCCAUL.pdf (1.7 MB)