Associations between Hogescholen and Universities in Flanders, Belgium

Associations between Hogescholen and Universities in Flanders, Belgium by Ignace Van Dingenen, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_VANDINGENEN.pdf (4.0 MB) - In connection to the implementation of the Bachelor-Master structure in Flanders it was decided that “hogescholen” can deliver Master degrees, if the Master studies are organised in cooperation with a university. The legal structure for this cooperation is the so-called “Associations”. This cooperation is obligatory and necessary in relation to the academic level of the two cycles at the “hogescholen” and the supply of Master studies. In Flanders are for the moment 5 Associations. Beside of the necessary cooperation on the academic levels of the two cycles, cooperation are centred on the following areas: Implementation of the Bachelor-Master structure, the development of rational study programmes, the organisation of reasonable connections between Bachelor- and Master studies, agreements on mutual procedures for recognition of earlier required competences, and mutual research programmes. Further on there is cooperation in fields like quality assurance and accreditation, social issues, the development of a mutual infrastructure. The Association University Gent (AUGent) is a partnership between University Gent, the Hogeschool Gent, the Arteveldehogeschool and the Hogeschool West-Vlaanderen. The AUGent was established the 29th of April 2003, and counts app. 50.000 students in East- and West Flanders.

FRAMEWORK Quality Project

FRAMEWORK Quality Project by David Taylor, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_TAYLOR.pdf (0.1 MB) - For many years many institutions within the Businet network have been providing the opportunity for students to complete a period of work experience outside of the students’ own country as part of their study programme. This has been done both with the support of the EU (Leonardo mobility projects, and Socrates Erasmus) and without European assistance. An analysis of the result of these placements informed that there was a need to consider the quality aspects of the placements provided and the placement process. Further questions were raised about how the validity of the placements could be measured, the recognition of the placement period, and how the value of the experience could be maximised, for all stakeholders in the process, the college, the student and the host company. To try and address these issues, an application for a Leonardo Thematic action project was made and accepted by the Commission. The project named Framework Q will provide a model for placement preparation, provision, mentoring, evaluation and recognition. The project provides an in depth examination of the three phases of the work placement – pre placement, during placement and post placement

The relationship between universities and higher education colleges in England

The relationship between universities and higher education colleges in England by Arthur Naylor, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_NAYLOR.pdf (0.4 MB) - There are 42 higher education colleges in England, 38 of which are members of the Standing Conference of Principals (SCOP). 9% of UK students are educated in higher education colleges. Higher education colleges range in size from large multi-faculty institutions with more students than many universities, to small or specialist institutions in the areas of art and design, music and the performing arts, agriculture and teacher education. Higher education colleges share many features with universities – a broad range of taught courses; research and specialist expertise; commitment to the needs of students and the values of higher education; common funding and quality assurance mechanisms.
A growing number of higher education colleges in England have gained the right to award their own degrees and many more are in the process of applying for degree-awarding powers. Nine SCOP member colleges now have degree-awarding powers. The remaining 29 colleges have their degrees validated by a partner university or national accrediting body. The Government has proposed that higher education colleges which have their own degree-awarding powers and 4,000 students can become universities. The proposal has met with opposition from many existing universities. Probably no more than half of the current number of higher education colleges will be able to meet the criteria to become universities.
At the same time as these developments in the structure of universities and colleges in England, there is increasing emphasis on collaboration across universities, higher education colleges and further education colleges on a regional basis. Areas of collaboration including widening participation; new forms of vocational training; services to business and the community; and research.

Associations and Partnerships between Institutions of Professional Higher Education and Universities – Text

Associations and Partnerships between Institutions of Professional Higher Education and Universities - Text by Philippe Mouraux, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_MOURAUX_text.pdf (42 KB)

Partnerships and associations between universities and institutions of professional Higher Education

Partnerships and associations between universities and institutions of professional Higher Education by Philippe Mouraux, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_MOURAUX.pdf (0.6 MB)

Networking in the Open European HE Area: Linking Shorter HE to the First Cycle of a Qualifications Framework for the European Higher Education Area

Networking in the Open European HE Area: Linking Shorter HE to the First Cycle of a Qualifications Framework for the European Higher Education Area by Jytte Mansfeld, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_MANSFELD.pdf (0.1 MB)

Analysis of TSC Education in the new signatory countries of the Bologna Declaration

Analysis of TSC Education in the new signatory countries of the Bologna Declaration by Magda Kirsch, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_KIRSCH.pdf (0.3 MB) - At the EURASHE Annual Conference in June 2003 in Gyöngyös, Hungary, the EURASHE survey: “Tertiary Short Cycle Education in Europe” was presented, and the Report was forwarded to the Bologna Follow-up Group . As a result of the survey and the recommendations, the Ministers in the Berlin Communiqué “invite the Follow-up Group to explore whether and how shorter higher education may be linked to the first cycle of a qualifications framework for the European Higher Education Area”. At the Berlin Summit the request for membership of the Bologna Group of Albania, Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Holy See, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” was accepted. – Accordingly, the analysis of the Tertiary Short Cycle Education will be extended to these countries. The analysis will be carried out in the period March – September 2004, resulting in a supplementary report. Preliminary results are presented at the Conference.

Quality Assurance Advances in Curriculum Developments: Standards and Procedures in Greek Higher Technological Education

Quality Assurance Advances in Curriculum Developments: Standards and Procedures in Greek Higher Technological Education by Ioannis Kazazis, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_KAZAZIS.pdf (0.2 MB) - Higher education in Greece comprises of two sectors, the University sector with 20 institutions having 200.000 students and the Technological sector with 15 Technological Education Institutions (TEIs) having 190.000 students. Both types of institutions are protected by the Constitution having degree-offering Departments with a minimum of 4-year undergraduate studies. After 1998 and before the Bologna process the TEIs have totally reformed and rebuilt their curricula of studies in all the degree-offering Departments according to the student work load and to the ECTS system (25 hours work load per ECTS credit). Quality assurance mechanisms were safeguarded by the Institute of Technological Education (ITE).

Quality Assurance/accreditation and the EURASHE sector of HE

Quality Assurance/accreditation and the EURASHE sector of HE by Guy Haug, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_HAUG.pdf (65 KB) - The presentation will sketch a possible scenario for quality assurance and/or accreditation mechanisms with a European dimension, guided by the need to set up for Europe a system that: capitalises on demonstrated reasons for trust and confidence across borders; caters for the diversity of systems, institutions and disciplines; and avoids overloading institutions with an additional layer of bureaucracy. In the confusion of often contradictory starting points, definitions and proposals, the presentation will endeavour to outline the main features of a QA/accreditation system suited for Europe, while paying special attention to aspects with specific relevance for Eurashe member institutions.

Conflicts of interests in QA – input and/or output based accreditation process?

Conflicts of interests in QA – input and/or output based accreditation process? by László Dinya, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_DINYA_text.pdf (86 KB)

Quality and Equality: core values for European Higher Education

Quality and Equality: core values for European Higher Education by David Crosier, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_CROSIER.pdf (0.5 MB) - EUA and EURASHE are both engaged in European reflection on how to improve higher education quality, and in particular what kind of practice should be promoted to assist institutions in fulfilling their primary responsibility for quality assurance. The Quality Culture Project had its origin in EUA's first action plan which emphasized that, in issues of quality assurance, the point of departure must be the institutions' capacity for developing a robust internal quality culture, and stressing that this capacity is integrally linked to institutional autonomy and public accountability. The Quality Culture Project is now being taken forward in a second round with participation from both EUA and EURASHE members. It aims to contribute to the development and embedding of a systematic and coherent quality culture as well as to the general goals of the Bologna process. This presentation will examine the results of the project from the first year, and point to how the notion of quality culture could be developed in the future European Higher Education Area, exploring in particular the neglected relationship between quality and equality.

The Berlin Communiqué with regard to Quality Assurance (QA)

The Berlin Communiqué with regard to Quality Assurance (QA) by Lucien Bollaert, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_BOLLAERT.pdf (1.3 MB) - In order to take up the mandate in the Quadripartite group (ENQA-EUA-EURASHE-ESIB), EURASHE installed an international working group on quality assurance and accreditation. It investigated its Bologna mandate and prepared EURASHE’s first coherent policy statement centred on QA and accreditation (Power Point presentation: EURASHE Position Paper on Quality Assurance and Accreditation, related to the Berlin Communiqué), which was adopted by the Executive Council on January 16, 2004.
EURASHE's position stresses:
- internal, external QA and accreditation as 3 distinctive steps in the quality assurance, linked by a self-assessment report, a public evaluation report and a public, motivated accreditation decision;
- the belief that institutional as well as programme items can be joint in these steps, evaluated by independent expert panels, consisting of not only peers but representatives of all stakeholders;
- the belief that generic standards and a general code of principles should and can be reached on a European level, for the external QA as well as for the expert reviewing of quality and/or accreditation agencies.

Towards an overarching framework of qualifications for the European Higher Education Area

Towards an overarching framework of qualifications for the European Higher Education Area by Mogens Berg, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_BERG.pdf (71 KB) - In Berlin September 2003 Ministers with responsibility for Higher Education decided to “encourage the member States to elaborate a framework of comparable and compatible qualifications for their higher education systems. They also undertake to elaborate an overarching framework of qualifications for the European Higher Education Area”. Further on they invited “the Follow Up Group to explore whether and how shorter higher education may be linked to the first cycle of a qualifications framework for the EHEA”. The chairman of the Bologna working group will explore the concept of a national qualifications framework, of an overarching framework and report from the ongoing work in the working group.

Quality Assurance and Student Involvement

Quality Assurance and Student Involvement by Johan Almqvist, Version 2004, EURASHE_AC_Nicosia_040506-07_pres_ALMQVIST.pdf (1.5 MB) - This presentation will examine why quality assurance at programme (course) and institutional level is crucial for students, prospective students and graduates, as well as examining why student involvement is crucial for quality assurance. The foundation of this analysis will be a look at the purpose of QA for students and other stakeholders. Finally, the link to national and European developments in quality assurance from ESIB's perspective will be presented.