Assuring and enhancing teaching and learning through effective alignment of internal and external review methods

Assuring and enhancing teaching and learning through effective alignment of internal and external review methods by Tina Harrison, Version 2014, Ia.5_Harrison.pdf (0.5 MB) - In recent years there has been a paradigm shift in education from teaching to learning. A key question is whether the same shift in focus is reflected in the core purpose of quality assurance processes. External quality assurance has been criticised for focusing on method and not student learning, but if effectively aligned with internal processes can have a transformational impact. Set against this context, the paper discusses three types of possible alignment: linear, nested and contiguous alignment. Using examples from the University of Edinburgh, the paper illustrates how external methods can be aligned in such a way to focus on assurance and enhancement of the student learning experience.

Quality internship. Students’ self-assessment in their work-based learning experiences

Quality internship. Students’ self-assessment in their work-based learning experiences by Roberta Piazza, Simona Rizzari, Version 2014, Ia.4_Piazza_Rizzari.pdf (0.3 MB) - Assessment in internship is an important part of the learning process aimed to provide a focus on what has been learned during the internship. Using diaries is a strategy to deepen learning, stimulate critical thinking, improve reflective practice and enables learners to valorise what they have learnt. The paper aims to analyse a number of key issues that could affect the quality of the process: students understanding of the purpose of diaries and the support given by tutors in relation to completing a reflective journal. To gain an understanding of these elements, the internship activity of 18 students (course on Expert on Job placement services) was monitored. The research activity carried on was based on the analysis of students journals to determine the extent and level of reflection achieved. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken in order to establish students’ views on the role of journals in promoting reflection and on the guidance given by tutors and teachers.

Learning for employability: Integrating employability into professional bachelor programmes and quality assurance in four higher education systems

Learning for employability: Integrating employability into professional bachelor programmes and quality assurance in four higher education systems by Renze Kolster, Don F. Westerheijden, Mark Frederiks, Version 2014, Ia.3_Kolster_Westerheijden_Frederiks.pdf (0.4 MB) - The paper reports on a comparative study, conducted in 2013-14, of four higher education systems (the Netherlands, Flanders, North Rhine-Westphalia and Ireland), which aimed to find out how higher education institutions integrate learning for employability into professional bachelor programmes in three different knowledge areas (mechanical engineering, social work and tourism), and how external quality assurance attended to employability aspects. Case studies of 24 selected, well-performing study programmes identified good practices as well as commonly-used elements and strategies, organised throughout the whole education cycle of input-process-results (output) and its quality assurance. Findings included that the studied professional bachelor programmes give sufficient attention to learning for employability, but that ways to do so differ by country and by field. Attention for employability differed across quality assurance systems as well.

Tutoring Support Office: Increasing Teacher – Student contact in Higher Education, Promoting a shift from Teaching to Learning?

Tutoring Support Office: Increasing Teacher – Student contact in Higher Education, Promoting a shift from Teaching to Learning? by Isabel Gonçalves, Ana Lucas, Gonçalo Moura, Pedro Sereno, Version 2014, Ia.2_Goncalves_Lucas_Moura_Sereno.pdf (0.7 MB) - After the Bologna Process (2006), tutoring activities have been introduced and disseminated among most IST Programmes as a way to support expected and needed changes on the teaching and learning practices in Higher Education. Before 2003, only peer mentoring existed to support the student’s transition and there were no specific measures to either support student’s academic strengths or difficulties, or training and support activities for teachers. In this article we characterize IST Tutoring Program, highlighting the aims, outcomes and outputs of several strategies taken to promote the communication between Teachers and Students. Strategies like training for Tutors and Tutees, Coaching or the combination of tutoring practices with soft skills training within first year introductory course are described. Low Academic Outcome Identification System (LAOS) is also referred to as a way to early identify students in stress and prevent the low academic cycle in which students tend to keep before they ask for external help.

Students’ Course Evaluation. A Shift of Paradigm at University of Luxembourg

Students' Course Evaluation. A Shift of Paradigm at University of Luxembourg by Elisa Mazzucato, Version 2014, Ia.1_Mazzucato.pdf (1.1 MB) - University of Luxembourg has recognized the difficulty of students’ course evaluation: it has replaced a formal evaluation system with a more open and flexible one, taking into account the dynamic and nonstandard process of teaching and the complexity in quality definition. The paradigm shift has been to provide a system that would allow ongoing improvement of a given course through a solid and continuous cooperation among students, lectures and administration; and not just be the final and definite judgment of the quality of teaching. At the same time it gives managers sufficient information to steer the organization toward its goals by means of a simple set of indicators having essentially a diagnostic purpose. The new evaluation system has shown the way to an innovative paradigm shift on how to consider evaluation results validity: where improvement is the main goal, consistency of meanings across interpreters may become much less important.

How could quality assurance foster a shift towards student-centred learning?

How could quality assurance foster a shift towards student-centred learning? by Praet, van de Velde, Dang, Foucart, Version 2015, I.3 Praet van De Velde Dang Foucart.pdf (2.8 MB)

Embedding Equality and Diversity in the Curriculum

Embedding Equality and Diversity in the Curriculum by Pauline Hanesworth, Stephanie Millar, Version 2014, I.2 Hanesworth.pdf (0.9 MB)

Aligning student-centered instructional design principles and quality assurance to foster continuous improvement of educational quality

Aligning student-centered instructional design principles and quality assurance to foster continuous improvement of educational quality by Jill Whittingham, Ineke Wolfhagen, Renée Stalmeijer, Diana Dolmans, Version 2014, I.1 Whittingham.pdf (2.0 MB)

The changing landscape of teaching and learning

The changing landscape of teaching and learning by Philippa Levy, Version 2014, Plenary I Levy.pdf (1.5 MB)

Quality Assurance for Teaching and Learning: Evolution and Revolution

Quality Assurance for Teaching and Learning: Evolution and Revolution by Sarah Ingle, Version 2014, IVb.6_Ingle.pdf (0.4 MB) - The main objective of this paper is to address the changing role of university quality assurance structures in particular regard to teaching and learning and the associated developments in online and distance learning. It begins with an outline of recent developments in Irish higher education followed by an examination of major transitions at national level within educational quality assurance in Ireland. The background to quality assurance in an Irish university is provided, followed by an overview of the quality assurance, referencing specific details of how teaching and learning is assured. Also outlined in the paper are developments in the Irish higher education sector in particular regard to online learning, along with the changes that have recently been undertaken in one university to reflect an increased emphasis on module and academic programme review processes. The move towards a blended learning approach, combining traditional and digital methodologies is also discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of successes and challenges.

An analysis of the Quality Assurance Agencies activities across borders

An analysis of the Quality Assurance Agencies activities across borders by Melinda Szabo, Version 2014, IVb.5_Szabo.pdf (0.6 MB) - Taking into consideration the paucity of information in the area of external quality assurance activity of quality assurance agencies (QAAs) the present paper provides a first attempt to fill in the gaps. The study is based on the responses of 60 surveyed QAAs and considers the activities of respondents who operate within different national contexts (evaluation/audit/accreditation at programme or institutional level), the practices and procedures employed (criteria and processes, publication of reports, follow-up activities, expert team, appeals and complaints procedure etc.) as well as the perceived benefits and challenges by these QAAs that carry out reviews across borders. The findings also provides a basis for considering measures that could facilitate the EQA activity of agencies within EHEA, while working in compliance with the European Standards and Guidelines.

Diversity and culture as pull factors for successfully practiced quality standards in virtual higher, further education and scientific trainings

Diversity and culture as pull factors for successfully practiced quality standards in virtual higher, further education and scientific trainings by Kathrin Wetzel, Marlen Arnold, Version 2014, IVb.4_Arnold_Wetzel.pdf (0.3 MB) - The Bologna process considers a greater internationalization and cultural diversity. In virtual higher education quality is particular important but difficult to manage and to reach. This paper shows the relevance of quality in the field of e-learning offers and demonstrates why quality standards are practical and indispensable for further academic education programs. In the field of virtual higher education students are often faced with uncertainty. The development of quality standards is not only useful because of the uncertainties but also to face diversity and cultural differences at a high standard. This paper presents the importance of the standards and linked them with the cultural characteristics of students. Moreover, it highlights gender and diversity aspects in the quality framework.

A comparison between two European universities of applied sciences

A comparison between two European universities of applied sciences by Annegret Reisner, Pia Hess, Anita Frehner, Anne Lequy, Thomas Hodel, , Version 2014, IVb.3_Reisner_Hess_Frehner_Lequy_Hodel.pdf (0.3 MB) - This paper looks at the way two European universities of applied sciences (UAS) deal with the “shift from teaching to learning”. It focuses on Berner Fachhochschule (BFH) and Hochschule Magdeburg-Stendal (HS MD-SDL) from the management point of view. First, the instruments used at both UAS for enhancing teaching quality are analyzed. Secondly, it looks at the evaluation of study programs and courses. To analyze the evaluation questionnaires, criteria are developed based on Ertel and Wehr (2007). Is it possible, with the given instruments, to “measure” the above-mentioned shift in teaching? We discover that the UAS use similar instruments in different ways. We ask what one UAS could learn from the other with regard to evaluation practice. At the end, we point out the potential of a learner-centered approach to evaluation for UAS with their "learning expertise" – in contrast to the universities, which are more focused on "research excellence".

Raising awareness of the quality teaching with students’ involvement

Raising awareness of the quality teaching with students’ involvement by Hermina Pika Radmilovič, Rok Hržič, Version 2014, IVb.2_Radmilovic.pdf (0.5 MB) - In accordance with the HE Act, the University of Maribor has among the governing bodies also the Students’ Council that is led by the student who is a Vice-rector and has an important role, especially in the university development of quality system. This means that the students have possibilities to influence decisions at the highest level within the University. The central role of students is crucial also in the assessment and quality of teaching. The University is currently developing professional development activities in teaching and learning as well as the training programs for other staff. The system did not exist for the institution as a whole. With the strong partnership of students, a series of activities are developed that help raising awareness of the quality teaching among the academic community at the University. The presentation will introduce the system of students’ role in this process with various examples.

Supporting the shift from teaching to learning in Professional Higher Education (PHE): examples from teacher and pharmacy education

Supporting the shift from teaching to learning in Professional Higher Education (PHE): examples from teacher and pharmacy education by Cathal de Paor, Version 2014, IVb.1_De Paor.pdf (0.3 MB) - The increasing emphasis on the outcomes of learning, as captured in the conference title has many implications for both internal and external quality assurance. One of the external evaluation activities that can play a role in helping to manage the shift from teaching to learning is the accreditation carried out by professional bodies in Professional Higher Education (PHE). This paper focuses on this kind of QA activity by examining a sample of accreditation reports for teacher and pharmacy education programmes. The analysis shows that the reports focus on inputs and on strategic programmatic issues, while there is less attention on the actual processes of teaching and learning. The paper argues that a greater focus on these issues could support quality assurance in PHE and the shift from teaching to learning.

The role of the administrative staff in the internal quality assurance systems: the case of the state-funded universities in Poland

The role of the administrative staff in the internal quality assurance systems: the case of the state-funded universities in Poland by Agnieszka Feliks-Długosz, Piotr Ciesielski, Version 2014, IVa.5_Feliks-Długosz_Ciesielski.pdf (0.4 MB) - The paper focuses on the role played by the administrative staff in the internal quality assurance systems managed by the universities in Poland. Conducted analysis concerned the professional liability and duties served by the teaching quality offices, i.e. the units of the all-university administration specializing in running the pro-quality initiatives: the research data was gathered from the websites of the Polish state-funded universities and then processed to create a classification of the most frequently managed teaching quality tasks and projects. In that it was possible to assess the efficiency and scope of the implementation of ENQA-approved Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area. The research results form a basis for a discussion on the optimal use of the staff potential in the enhancement of the university teaching prospects and perspectives.

How does the Estonian system of quality assurance in higher education support teaching to learning paradigm shift based on the example of Estonian IT College

How does the Estonian system of quality assurance in higher education support teaching to learning paradigm shift based on the example of Estonian IT College by Inga Vau, Merle Varendi, Version 2014, IVa.4_Vau_Varendi.pdf (0.2 MB) - The quality of learning has evolved into the core of the quality system of higher education institutions over the last decade. Different external evaluation processes are implemented to give stakeholders confidence that educational institutions meet the required quality.
The IT College has undergone both external evaluations of higher education mandatory in Estonia. External evaluation assessment areas from the aspect of learning paradigm have been analysed in this article. The structure of the article follows the structure of institutional accreditation form, the assessment criteria of study programme group are involved if relevant. It can be argued that the external evaluation of higher education rather supports shifting from teaching to learning, but it is also difficult for the external parties to assess the real functioning of an institution. Further discussion should focus on how institutions’ own quality assurance system can identify learning-centred teaching and support the implementation of the learning paradigm.

From teaching assessment to formative learning assessment

From teaching assessment to formative learning assessment by Marta Pile, Isabel Gonçalves, Sofia Sá, João Ribeiro, Version 2014, IVa.3_Pile_Goncalves_Ribeiro_Sa.pdf (1.0 MB) - Considering some of the Bologna principles, this paper aims to show the main changes and consequences of the performance assessment system of IST teaching body (QUC, Course Unit Quality), in particular taking into account two key changes of the teaching paradigm (Bologna): placing the student at the heart of the learning process and building up curricula based on competence profiles. Relying on a summative approach, the process has undergone deep changes that helped the formative character of the system, by ensuring that a joint systematic reflection of all stakeholders in the teaching and learning process was made, and the corrective actions in accordance with the outcomes.

Euro-Mediterranean perspectives on the complex shifts between external and internal QA of teaching and learning, at strategic and practical levels: Enhancing Quality Assurance Management (EQuAM) in Jordanian universities

Euro-Mediterranean perspectives on the complex shifts between external and internal QA of teaching and learning, at strategic and practical levels: Enhancing Quality Assurance Management (EQuAM) in Jordanian universities by Nick Harris, Nicolas Patrici, Abdullah Al-Zoubi, Mohammad Mismar, Bashar K. Hammad, Khaled M Gharaibeh, Rafael Llavori de Micheo, Version 2014, IVa.2_Patrici_Mismar_Hammad_Gharaibeh_Llavori_Harris.pdf (0.4 MB) - EQuAM (Enhancing Quality Assurance Management) is a collaborative project involving European and Jordanian universities and QA agencies. It links successful aspects of the Bologna Process to the development of policy and practice in Jordan. Despite significantly different contexts, shared expectations have been identified, leading to QA Guidelines. These target issues specifically faced by university leaders, academics and students, addressing their different roles, responsibilities and expectations. An accompanying White Paper provides necessary political support. Drawing on the ESG and the Jordanian (HEAC) Quality Standards the Guidelines have demonstrated an immediate impact in the first Pilots. The success of the project’s approach – starting with identification of shared expectations rather than comparing procedures/criteria – will be discussed, along with some emerging answers to issues for further inter-regional collaborations such as: can the ESG be applicable in widely different contexts? How to move from very compliance and input driven QA approaches to something else - institutional responsibility and quality culture?

Quality audit: Fit for what purpose?

Quality audit: Fit for what purpose? by Jon Haakstad, Version 2014, IVa.1_Haakstad.pdf (0.4 MB) - The paper discusses the current status of one of the traditional methods of external quality assurance in European higher education, the institutional quality audit. Taking its point of departure in a recent booklet about the method by the agency-based ‘Quality Audit Network’, the paper asks whether today’s audits, via their steering of institutional QA systems, relate sufficiently well to the educational quality of actual provision. Have institutional QA systems, and the auditing of these, become too large and unfocused, more concerned with performance by statistical indicators than with educational quality? Is the stress too much on ‘quality strategy’ and ‘quality policy’ at the institutional level, at the expense of didactic practice at the programme level? A slimmer and more focused approach, based primarily on information from the level of delivery and audited in a more investigative way, is indicated.

From ‘quality assurance of teaching’ to ‘quality enhancement of learning’: A conceptual contribution

From ‘quality assurance of teaching’ to ‘quality enhancement of learning’: A conceptual contribution by Vidar Gynnild, Version 2014, IV.2 Gynild.pdf (0.2 MB)

How do connotations of to learn and to teach influence learning and teaching?

How do connotations of to learn and to teach influence learning and teaching? by Andrea Trink, Version 2014, IV.1 Trink.pdf (0.3 MB)

Addressing student-centred learning: are quality audits fit for purpose?

Addressing student-centred learning: are quality audits fit for purpose? by Dietlinde Kastelliz, Friederike Leetz, Version 2014, III.3 Leetz_Kastelliz Quality audits_ppt.pdf (0.7 MB)

Quality audits – fit for purpose? Student-centred learning, teaching and assessment and external reviews of higher education institutions’ internal quality management

Quality audits – fit for purpose? Student-centred learning, teaching and assessment and external reviews of higher education institutions’ internal quality management by Dietlinde Kastelliz, Friederike Leetz, Version 2014, III.3 Leetz_Kastelliz Quality audits_paper.pdf (0.1 MB) - In 2015 the ESG shall be revised to improve their clarity, applicability and usefulness. It is to be expected that the development of the Bologna Process and in particular the shift from teaching to learning will also be taken into account. A new standard on studentcentred learning has already been proposed to the BFUG. Pronounced as a “major addition”, it could be challenging to implement this standard or a comparable one into internal and external quality assurance. This challenge might be particularly present for those external quality assurance approaches whose focus is on higher education institutions’ quality management systems, because the reviews tend to address quality aspects of teaching and learning rather indirectly. In the light of the estimated “studentcenteredness” this paper shall analyse and compare quality audits in a number of European countries on whether they currently refer to student-centred learning and what future measures might be taken.

Quality Assurance of Online, Open and Flexible Higher Education

Quality Assurance of Online, Open and Flexible Higher Education by Anthony F. Camilleri, Version 2014, III.2 Camilleri Quality Assurance of Online Flexible Education.pdf (0.7 MB)

Rankings and Institutional Strategies and Processes

Rankings and Institutional Strategies and Processes by Ellen Hazelkorn, Version 2014, III.1 Hazelkorn_Rankings.pdf (1.6 MB)

Student-centred learning and quality education: the implementation of student-centred learning in quality assurance procedures

Student-centred learning and quality education: the implementation of student-centred learning in quality assurance procedures by Asnate Kažoka, Erin Nordal, Version 2014, II.3 Kazoka Nordal Student centred_paper.pdf (0.3 MB) - Quality education and student-centred learning has been one of the top priorities of the European Students’ Union (ESU) for years. The results of recent research coordinated by ESU show that not only is student-centred learning an essential component of quality education, but also from the viewpoint of students quality education is to a large extent equal to student centred education and vice versa. As quality assurance is one of the main areas that influence reforms in teaching and learning, the authors explore how the concept of student-centred learning is incorporated in current quality assurance policy and procedures. This paper looks at the student concept of quality education and the practical definition of student-centred learning developed by the European Students’ Union. It compares both concepts and gives recommendations for further implementation of student-centred learning in quality assurance policy and procedures.

Student-centred learning (SCL) and quality education: The implementation of student-centred learning in quality assurance procedures

Student-centred learning (SCL) and quality education: The implementation of student-centred learning in quality assurance procedures by Elisabeth Gehrke, Blazhe Todorovski, Version 2014, II.3 Gehrke Todorovski_Student centred.pdf (1.2 MB)

Approaches to quality in professional higher education

Approaches to quality in professional higher education by Stefan Delplace, Lucien Bollaert, Version 2014, II.2 Delplace_Approaches to Q in PHE SDelplace.pdf (0.4 MB)

(A Manual for Internal) Quality Assurance (IQA) in Higher Education (HE) with a special focus on Professional Higher Education (PHE)

(A Manual for Internal) Quality Assurance (IQA) in Higher Education (HE) with a special focus on Professional Higher Education (PHE) by Lucien Bollaert, Version 2014, II.2 Bollaert_20141114EQAFManual_LBfinalanimation.pdf (1.8 MB)

From teaching to learning: how quality assurance in UK higher education has responded to this shift by promoting a culture of enhancement

From teaching to learning: how quality assurance in UK higher education has responded to this shift by promoting a culture of enhancement by Elizabeth Halford, John Lea, Version 2014, Ib.6_Halford_Lea.pdf (0.3 MB) - This paper addresses the question of how the system of quality assurance in UK higher education has responded to the shift from teaching to learning by promoting a culture of enhancement in higher education institutions. It contends that the adoption of approaches encouraging active learning by students has been mirrored by a shift in quality assurance methods, which have moved from compliance to enhancement, by requiring institutions to take deliberate steps to improve their provision. This has resulted in student engagement becoming a central expectation of reviews. This contention is supported by two illustrative case studies identified by QAA review methods.

An international approach to quality assurance of new providers in higher education: the CHEA Quality Platform

An international approach to quality assurance of new providers in higher education: the CHEA Quality Platform by Judith Eaton, Stamenka Uvalic-Trumbic, Version 2014, Ib.5_Eaton_Uvalic-Trumbic.pdf (0.3 MB) - Higher education is undergoing deep transformations driven by increasing demand, high youth unemployment, rising costs and new uses of technology. These have triggered an unprecedented diversification of provision and greater flexibility and autonomy in learner’s
paths. Fresh approaches to quality assurance are needed for the emerging innovations in higher education. Higher learning is now provided from different sources, MOOCs, OERs, competency-based education, experiential learning, shorter courses. Learners need the assurance that these innovative forms of higher education are based on systematic processes, authentic content and credible assessment. This paper will review some of the transformations of higher education in the US and globally; present the mission of CHEA’s international quality group (CIQG) and its focus on quality implications of these innovative developments and finally, it will describe a new international tool, the CHEA “quality platform” which is presently piloted to review the quality of innovative and technology-mediated providers of higher education.

Implementation of the first national student engagement survey through partnership and collaboration

Implementation of the first national student engagement survey through partnership and collaboration by Sean O’Reilly, Kevin Donoghue, Muiris O’Connor, Jim Murray, Vivienne Patterson, Lewis Purser, Version 2014, Ib.4_OReilly_Donoghue_OConnor_Murray_Patterson_Purser.pdf (0.1 MB) - A unique collaborative partnership of higher education institutions, students’ representatives and national agencies has implemented the first national survey of student engagement in Ireland, the Irish Survey of Student Engagement (ISSE). The partnership has achieved greater progress than would have been possible by any one group of stakeholders. The national survey, focussing on engagement of students with their higher education experience, has generated a new, valuable and rich data set to inform enhancement activities within institutions as well as informing national dialogue and policy. ISSE is based on similar surveys used in the US (since 2000) and Australasia (since 2007) and an increasing number of other countries worldwide. As such, it provides a national and international context for analysis of institutional data. This paper outlines the rationale for development of the ISSE, explains the approach taken to implement and increasingly embed the survey into the academic cycle, and highlights a number of issues that remain under active discussion.

Student Feedback Gathered by the Trade Unions – Much Needed Perspective on Employability?

Student Feedback Gathered by the Trade Unions - Much Needed Perspective on Employability? by Suvi Eriksson, Pirre Hyötynen, Jussi-Pekka Teini, Version 2014, Ib.3_Eriksson_Hyotynen_Teini.pdf (0.4 MB) - Are universities responsible for the employability of graduates? In Finland it has been more or less self-evident that people with a university degree are not struck by unemployment. Now, even though the situation in Finland is much less concerning than it could be
and higher education still is a major protection against unemployment, the Trade Unions SEFE and TEK see that there are enough reasons to take better care of our higher education from the employability point of view. To have a role in discussion around employability and to emphasize the importance of actual learning, SEFE and TEK regularly gather feedback from newly graduates. The results are utilized by influencing the universities as well as political decision makers. In this session we will discuss graduate employability in the university education from a QA point of view as well as the role that a trade union can have in this discussion.

Students’ role in quality enhancement – a reflection of functional stupidity or an implication of “Quality as Practice”?

Students’ role in quality enhancement – a reflection of functional stupidity or an implication of “Quality as Practice”? by Hannele Keränen, Elina Holm, Version 2014, Ib.2_Keränen_Holm.pdf (1.8 MB) - This paper deals with students’ role in quality enhancement in Higher Education Institutes (HEIs). The main focus is on student feedback, where the discourse fluctuates from “absolutely necessary” to “waste of everyone’s time” extremity. The consensus discourse emphasizes the importance of measuring students’ satisfaction and perceptions of the quality of study programs. The dissensus discourse points out that feedback is rarely helpful, because formal questionnaires are designed by administrators and are therefore perceived as inappropriate for evaluating quality. The paper concludes that student feedback can provide important perspectives for assessing quality, but more importantly, the everyday commitment and involvement to the continuous improvement through the
“Quality as Practice” –approach ought to be promoted. This approach challenges the rational – and quantitative - paradigms, which still dominate the strategies for the management of quality. It also celebrates the involvement of the key stakeholders of quality in higher education: students and teachers.

Dialog-based student feedback: formative approaches to evaluate academic teaching and as “crisis intervention”

Dialog-based student feedback: formative approaches to evaluate academic teaching and as “crisis intervention” by Maiken Bonnes, Christian Ganseuer, Hauke Sanders, Version 2014, Ib.1_Bonnes_Ganseuer_Sanders.pdf (0.3 MB) - Formative student feedback can be used to uncover problems early on and establish a collaborative learning as well as quality culture at universities. Beyond that the quality loops- approach of Internal Quality Assurance Systems most likely need to be stimulated by dialogue intensive tools instead of traditional student satisfaction surveys. Methods such as the Teaching Analysis Poll (TAP) and course evaluation via student representatives were practically approved and further developed in a two years project in two faculties of University of Duisburg-Essen. These methods aim to benefit both the quality of student learning and the professional development of the teacher. While TAPs are conducted by an uninvolved moderator, the student representatives have to fulfil different roles, which can be conflicting. In fact, both approaches have strengths and weaknesses especially when they are used as a “crisis intervention” when there are serious problems in class.

Accreditation, Regulation and Self Evaluation – a Game Theoretic Viewpoint

Accreditation, Regulation and Self Evaluation – a Game Theoretic Viewpoint by Michal Daloya, Dafna Beeri, Avner Halevy, , Version 2014, Ia.6_ Halevy_Daloya_Beeri.pdf (0.3 MB) - Higher Education Institutes operate in the forefront of knowledge and are entrusted with the provision of relevant knowledge, tools and methods to their customers – our society. HEIs operate in a quasi-market; that is, their customers lack the abilities to effectively and efficiently assess the quality of rendered services. Thus, assessing and regulating bodies were formed, either state-initiated or voluntary, aiding the public in getting a perception of the quality of academic services. The external involvement takes the form of periodical processes of quality self evaluation done by academic units, complemented by external evaluations and assessment reports. We will look into the effectiveness of this approach from a game theoretical point of view and suggest that adherence to well proven frameworks of optimally-constructed bargaining and cooperative games may be most beneficial to all stakeholders, most of all our present and future societies.